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Jeffrey Lieberman given the ACNP Julius Axelrod Mentorship Award

December 05, 2016

The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) has named Jeffrey Lieberman, M.D. as one of two winners of the 2016 Julius Axelrod Mentorship Award. Dr. Lieberman is the Lawrence C. Kolb Professor and Chairman, Department of Psychiatry at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, and Psychiatrist-in-Chief of the New York-Presbyterian Hospital-Columbia University Medical Center. The Axelrod Mentorship Award, being presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the ACNP in Hollywood, Florida, is presented to an ACNP member who has made an outstanding contribution to neuropsychopharmacology by mentoring and developing young scientists into leaders in the field.

Dr. Lieberman is a leading research scientist, a member of the National Academy of Science's Institute of Medicine, and a past president of the American Psychiatric Association. His research has focused on the neurobiology and treatment of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders and led to the transformative mental healthcare strategy for the early detection and prevention of schizophrenia. He served as Principal Investigator of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness Research Program (CATIE), the largest study ever sponsored by the NIMH. In addition to his own accomplishments in research and as a national leader in psychiatry, he has also trained a generation of clinical and translational researchers, many of whom are now ACNP members, fellows and leading clinical researchers. A number of his former mentees now hold senior and leadership positions at the NIH, academic medical institutions and various pharmaceutical companies.
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Media contact: Erin Colladay at (ecolladay@acnp.org; 615-649-3074) ACNP, founded in 1961, is a professional organization of more than 1000 leading scientists, including four Nobel Laureates. The mission of ACNP is to further research and education in neuropsychopharmacology and related fields in the following ways: promoting the interaction of a broad range of scientific disciplines of brain and behavior in order to advance the understanding of prevention and treatment of disease of the nervous system including psychiatric, neurological, behavioral and addictive disorders; encouraging scientists to enter research careers in fields related to these disorders and their treatment; and ensuring the dissemination of relevant scientific advances.

American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

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