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Martin Katz given the ACNP Paul Hoch Distinguished Service Award

December 05, 2016

The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) has named Martin M. Katz, Ph.D. as the winner of the 2016 Paul Hoch Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Katz became a member of the ACNP in 1963, and has been actively contributing to the College for over 50 years. The Hoch Award, presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the ACNP in Hollywood, Florida, recognizes unusually significant contributions to the College.

Dr, Katz has devoted his career to studying the action of antidepressants in clinical populations and contributing to the theoretical understanding of their mechanisms of action. For over three decades Dr. Katz served on key ACNP committees. As Chair of the Program Committee in 1978 he brought to the meeting such notable figures as Linus Pauling and internationally known epidemiologist, Eric Stromgren. He played a prominent role in founding the ACNP Journal, Neuropsychopharmacology, and contributed to early ACNP publications. In more recent years he was one of the editors of the ten-volume series, An Oral History of Neuropsychopharmacology.
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Media contact: Erin Colladay at (ecolladay@acnp.org; 615-649-3074)

ACNP, founded in 1961, is a professional organization of more than 1000 leading scientists, including four Nobel Laureates. The mission of ACNP is to further research and education in neuropsychopharmacology and related fields in the following ways: promoting the interaction of a broad range of scientific disciplines of brain and behavior in order to advance the understanding of prevention and treatment of disease of the nervous system including psychiatric, neurological, behavioral and addictive disorders; encouraging scientists to enter research careers in fields related to these disorders and their treatment; and ensuring the dissemination of relevant scientific advances.

American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

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