Nav: Home

Early treatment may prevent progression to multiple myeloma

December 05, 2016

SAN DIEGO, CA - Early intervention with an immunotherapy-based drug combination may prevent progression of high-risk "smoldering" multiple myeloma to the full-blown disease, according to researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The interim results of a phase 2 clinical trial are to be presented at the 58th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego on December 5, 2016. According to Irene Ghobrial, MD, first author of the report, the findings represent "a promising starting point for the paradigm shift towards early therapeutic intervention in patients with high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma." Ghobrial is also co-principal investigator of the Center for Prevention of Progression of Blood Cancers at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center.

The combination of the immunotherapy agent elotuzumab with lenalidomide and dexamethasone was well tolerated, with a low rate of grade 3 or 4 toxicities, the study found.

Individuals are said to have smoldering multiple myeloma if they have evidence of disease in the bone marrow and other pathological signs putting them at risk of developing myeloma, the incurable blood cancer diagnosed in about 30,000 people annually, with 12,650 deaths expected in 2016, according to the American Cancer Society.

Smoldering multiple myeloma patients with high-risk indicators have a 50 percent chance of progressing to symptomatic multiple myeloma within two years. A number of clinical trials are evaluating whether early intervention during the smoldering phase is safe and can prevent myeloma progression.

Ghobrial presented data on 47 of the 50 patients enrolled in the study to date, including 23 patients who completed nine treatment cycles. The drug combination caused tumor shrinkage in 82.6 percent of the latter group of patients, with 34.8 percent complete and very good partial responses.

"Many of these patients are in remission at a median follow-up time of seven months," said Ghobrial. "Some patients have been followed for 23 months, and we haven't seen progression to symptomatic disease in any patient."

"The early results suggest better results than those from a previous trial in which patients received a combination of lenalidomide and dexamethasone," said Ghobrial. "While the interim results are very exciting, I think we need a randomized phase 3 trial before we can make [early intervention] the standard of care."
-end-
Senior authors of the report are Kenneth C. Anderson, MD, and Paul Richardson, MD, of Dana-Farber.

About Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

From achieving the first remissions in childhood cancer with chemotherapy in 1948, to developing the very latest new therapies, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is one of the world's leading centers of cancer research and treatment. It is the only center ranked in the top 4 of U.S. News and World Report's Best Hospitals for both adult and pediatric cancer care.

Dana-Farber sits at the center of a wide range of collaborative efforts to reduce the burden of cancer through scientific inquiry, clinical care, education, community engagement, and advocacy. Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center provides the latest in cancer care for adults; Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center for children. The Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center unites the cancer research efforts of five Harvard academic medical centers and two graduate schools, while Dana-Farber Community Cancer Care provides high quality cancer treatment in communities outside Boston's Longwood Medical Area.

Dana-Farber is dedicated to a unique, 50/50 balance between cancer research and care, and much of the Institute's work is dedicated to translating the results of its discovery into new treatments for patients locally and around the world.

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Related Multiple Myeloma Articles:

New multiple myeloma therapy shows promise in preclinical study
A new alpha-radioimmunotherapy, 212Pb-anti-CD38, has proven effective in preventing tumor growth and increasing survival in multiple myeloma tumor-bearing mice, according to new research published in the July issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
A safer cell therapy harnesses patient T cells to fight multiple myeloma
A treatment for multiple myeloma that harnesses the body's cancer-fighting T cells was safe in humans and showed preliminary signs of effectiveness, according to a clinical trial involving 23 patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant disease.
Colorado tool, My-DST, may pick best multiple myeloma treatment
Response of liquid biopsies to approved drugs can help show resistance, predict response.
Case study: Treating COVID-19 in a patient with multiple myeloma
A case study of a patient in Wuhan, China, suggests that the immunosuppressant tocilizumab may be an effective COVID-19 treatment for very ill patients who also have multiple myeloma and other blood cancers.
New drug could reverse treatment resistance in advanced multiple myeloma
Researchers at the VU University Medical Center in the Netherlands have tested a new drug in patient samples and mice with multiple myeloma and discovered that it was effective even in advanced disease -- a point when many patients currently run out of options.
Single gene cluster loss may contribute to initiation/progression of multiple myeloma
The loss of one copy of the miR15a/miR16-1 gene cluster promoted initiation and progression of multiple myeloma in mice.
New CAR-T target yields promising results for multiple myeloma
In research published today in the journal Nature Communications, Utah-based scientists describe a novel way to treat cancers using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy.
BCMA-targeted immunotherapy can lead to durable responses in multiple myeloma
An experimental, off-the-shelf immunotherapy that combines a targeted antibody and chemotherapy can lead to potentially durable responses in multiple myeloma patients whose disease has relapsed or is resistant to other standard therapies.
Study finds racial disparities in treatment of multiple myeloma patients
Among patients with multiple myeloma, African-Americans and Hispanics start treatment with a novel therapy significantly later than white patients, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances.
NEJM publishes bb2121 Phase 1 data in patients with multiple myeloma
Celgene Corporation and bluebird bio announce results from ongoing multicenter Phase 1 study of bb2121 anti-BCMA CAR T cell therapy in patients with multiple myeloma published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
More Multiple Myeloma News and Multiple Myeloma Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.