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Exploring the past, present and future of regenerative medicine

December 05, 2016

Future Science Group (FSG) is excited to announce the release of the 10-Year Anniversary Special Focus Issue of Regenerative Medicine entitled "Regenerative medicine: past, present and future", which reflects on how the field has changed in the past 10 years.

The special issue takes a look at the past decade in regenerative medicine and provides an overview and perspectives on the progress being made in the field as a whole, as well as in a number of more specific areas including cellular therapy, genome editing, pluripotent stem cell research, ligament regenerative engineering, nanotechnology, immunogenicity and regenerative pharmacology. The issue also provides insight into major institutions involved in the field of regenerative medicine, describing their history, current work and plans for the future.

The Special Focus Issue has been guest edited by Robert Lanza (Astellas Institute for Regenerative Medicine, MA, USA), who serves as one of the journal's Associate Editors. Lanza provided a scene-setting foreword for the issue where he looks back at the last decade in regenerative medicine and describes some of the incredible progress made in the field. He then goes on to provide an overview of the wide variety of work presented in the issue including reviews, perspectives and special reports, amongst others.

Lanza concludes: "The field of regenerative medicine has continued to grow and change rapidly in the past 10 years. We believe that these articles help highlight important advances that have occurred, and that are likely to impact the future success of the field. The publication of this special issue celebrates an exciting milestone for Regenerative Medicine - the tenth year anniversary of the journal. I hope you will join me in congratulating the journal for reaching this major milestone."

Commissioning Editor for Regenerative Medicine Adam Price-Evans commented: "Bursting on to the scene in 2006 with the ALPSP/Charlesworth Award for Best New Journal, Regenerative Medicine has remained at the forefront of the field for the past decade. The journal continues to showcase the latest research and expert commentary from leaders in the field of regenerative medicine and we look forward to the next ten years."

View the special focus issue: http://www.futuremedicine.com/toc/rme/11/8

Lanza's foreword as guest editor is free to read, here: http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/full/10.2217/rme-2016-0500
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The journal

Regenerative Medicine is part of the internationally recognized Future Medicine portfolio and is supported by a multidisciplinary, international editorial board comprising leading researchers and opinion leaders from academia and industry, including Senior Editor Chris Mason (UCL, UK), and Associate Editors Phillipe Menasché (Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, FR), Gail Naughton (Histogen Inc., CA, USA) and the aforementioned Robert Lanza.

Regenerative Medicine focusses on the entire spectrum of approaches in regenerative medicine, including small molecule drugs, biologics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, and cell and gene therapies. The peer-reviewed journal uniquely supports this important area of biomedical science and healthcare by publishing the very best regenerative medicine research and opinion, encompassing all aspects of the sector ranging from discovery research, to clinical development and commercialization.

Regenerative Medicine is committed to high-quality scholarly publications, operating a double-blind peer review system, and ensures that all original research and review articles are assessed by a minimum of three experts. It is also committed to supporting authors after publication, and partner with the award-winning Kudos to help authors increase the reach of their published articles. The journal is also partnered with RegMedNet, a free eCommunity aiming to promote global collaboration between all members of the regenerative medicine field as well as keep users up to date with the latest news and opinion, by providing exclusive features, webinars and more. Find out more: http://www.futuremedicine.com/loi/rme

Call for papers

The journal is currently inviting submissions of original research, review and perspective pieces, as well as shorter pieces such as editorials and organizational profiles. Submissions are being accepted via the journal's online submission site. Alternatively, authors are invited to direct any article proposals or general queries to the Commissioning Editor, Adam Price-Evans at a.price-evans@futuremedicine.com.

About Future Science Group (FSG)

Founded in 2001, London-based FSG is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological and scientific research. FSG's portfolio includes two imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. In addition to the core journal publishing business, FSG develops specialist eCommunities. Key titles and sites include Bioanalysis Zone, RegMedNet, Nanomedicine and the award-winning Regenerative Medicine.

The aim of FSG is to service the advancement of clinical practice and drug research by enhancing the efficiency of communications among clinicians, researchers and decision-makers, and by providing innovative solutions to their information needs. This is achieved through a customer-centric approach, use of new technologies, products that deliver value-for-money and uncompromisingly high standards. Please see http://www.futuresciencegroup.com and http://www.futuremedicine.com for more information.

For additional information on Regenerative Medicine, please contact:

Adam Price-Evans Commissioning Editor, Future Science Group a.price-evans@futuremedicine.com

Future Science Group

Related Regenerative Medicine Articles:

A new discovery in regenerative medicine
An international collaboration involving Monash University and Duke-NUS researchers have made an unexpected world-first stem cell discovery that may lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy.
New research into stem cell mutations could improve regenerative medicine
Research from the University of Sheffield has given new insight into the cause of mutations in pluripotent stem cells and potential ways of stopping these mutations from occurring.
Keratin scaffolds could advance regenerative medicine and tissue engineering for humans
Researchers at Mossakowski Medical Research Center of the Polish Academy of Science have developed a simple method for preparing 3D keratin scaffold models which can be used to study the regeneration of tissue.
New prize-winning research highlights potential of immune intervention in improving regenerative medicine
Joana Neves is the 2019 grand prize winner of the Sartorius & Science Prize for Regenerating Medicine & Cell Therapy, for work in mice that offers a promising approach to improve the outcome of regenerative stem cell-based therapies aimed at delaying age-related degenerative diseases.
NUS Medicine researchers can reprogramme cells to original state for regenerative medicine
Scientists from NUS Medicine have found a way to induce totipotency in embryonic cells that have already matured into pluripotency.
A new material for regenerative medicine capable to control cell immune response
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Montana (USA) proposed a new promising material for regenerative medicine for recovery of damaged tissues and blood vessels.
Optoceutics: A new technique using light for regenerative medicine
Researchers in Italy at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia used visible light together with photo-sensitive and biocompatible materials to facilitate the formation of new blood vessels in vitro.
Major stem cell discovery to boost research into development and regenerative medicine
A new approach has enabled researchers to create Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) of both pig and human cells.
Spinning-prism microscope helps gather stem cells for regenerative medicine
Pluripotent stem cells are crucial to regenerative medicine, but better screening methods are needed to isolate safe and effective cells for medical use.
'Cellular dust' provides new hope for regenerative medicine
While stem cells have the most therapeutic potential, the benefits of regenerative medicine may best be mobilised using extracellular vesicles (EVs), also known in the past as 'cellular dust'.
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