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Genetically altered goats may produce milk that causes fewer allergic reactions

December 05, 2016

The presence of the allergen β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) in the milk of goats and other ungulates restricts the consumption of goat's milk by humans. In a new study, researchers bred goats to lack BLG or to express human α-lactalbumin in place of BLG.

The investigators found that milk from these goats triggered less severe allergic reactions in susceptible mice, suggesting that this technology might be an effective tool to reduce allergic reactions to milk and improve nutrition. The study is published in The FEBS Journal.
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Wiley

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