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Potential target for restoring ejaculation in men with spinal cord injuries or ejaculatory disorders

December 05, 2016

New research provides insights on how to restore the ability to ejaculate in men who are not able to do so.

In humans, the crucial role of the spinal cord in controlling ejaculation is based within a group of neurons located in the L3-L5 segments. In patients with a spinal cord lesion, the intactness of the L3-L5 segments was a determining factor for inducing ejaculation. Therefore, targeting this region might be a promising strategy for the recovery of ejaculation after spinal cord injury.

"The existence of a spinal ejaculation generator in the lumbar spinal cord of men was concluded from neuro-histological investigations and clinical observations from spinal cord injured patients. This generator is a promising therapeutic target for spinal cord injury patients unable to ejaculate, and for other ejaculatory disorders," said Dr. Francois Giuliano, senior author of the Annals of Neurology study.
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Wiley

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