Nav: Home

Researchers stress the need for research on Ebola virus disease in great apes

December 05, 2016

Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a threat to human health, but it also threatens the survival of African great apes. A new review examines the current knowledge about EVD in great apes and documents the link between outbreaks in apes and in humans, mainly via bushmeat consumption.

The review's authors note that vaccination of wild apes would simultaneously reduce the risk of transmission into the human population and the impact of EVD on the endangered great apes.

"Even though theoretically this may sound like a great plan, the elusive nature of great apes, living in dense tropical rainforests, raises serious questions about its feasibility " said Dr. Fabian Leendertz, senior author of the Mammal Review article.

Additional research, systematic wildlife surveillance, and public education about the risk of bushmeat consumption are needed.
-end-


Wiley

Related Great Apes Articles:

Apes' inner ears could hide clues to evolutionary history of hominoids
Studying the inner ear of apes and humans could uncover new information on our species' evolutionary relationships, suggests a new study published today in eLife.
Koalas climb like apes but bound on the ground like marsupials
Many marsupials have made a life in the trees, but koalas have evolved the grasping hand and long limbs reminiscent of primates, so Christofer Clemente from the University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia, wondered whether koalas move like other marsupials or primates.
Fossil suggests apes, old world monkeys moved in opposite directions from shared ancestor
In terms of their body plan, Old World monkeys -- a group that includes primates like baboons and macaques -- are generally considered more similar to ancestral species than apes are.
How human brain development diverged from great apes
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, present new insights into the development of the human brain and differences in this process compared to other great apes.
A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes
University at Buffalo researchers discovered that the human diet -- a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture -- has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates.
Great apes have you on their mind
For decades a fierce debate was raised on whether any nonhuman species possess the ability of 'Theory of Mind'.
Flies may also spread disease among monkeys and apes
People the world over have a good sense that we do not want flies landing on our food.
The new great wave
Radical Inkless Technology produces the world's smallest 'Ukiyo-e' and promises to revolutionize how we print.
Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes -- watch what happens
Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects.
Contact with monkeys and apes puts populations at risk
Animal diseases that infect humans are a major threat to human health, and diseases often spillover to humans from nonhuman primates.
More Great Apes News and Great Apes Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.