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New recommendations for the conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis

December 05, 2018

Economic evaluations that compare interventions in terms of costs and outcomes are increasingly used by decision makers, with economic evaluations now playing an increasing role in pricing and reimbursement decisions.

In the field of osteoporosis, the number of economic evaluations has increased markedly, however the variable quality and considerable heterogeneity of the evaluations often limit their comparability and use by decision makers.

To address this handicap, an expert working group convened by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the US Branch of the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), met at a consensus meeting to establish recommendations for the design and conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis, as well as guidance for reporting these evaluations. Additionally, a set of minimum criteria for evaluations and an osteoporosis-specific checklist of items to incorporate in economic reports were established. Download Recommendations for the conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis: outcomes of an Experts' consensus meeting

Lead author Dr Mickael Hiligsmann, Associate Professor in Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment at CAPHRI Care and Public Health Research Institute of Maastricht University, stated: "Although disease-specific recommendations for economic evaluations have been developed in other disease areas previously, this study is to our knowledge the first that provides a list of recommendations and minimum requirements for the design, conduct and reporting of an osteoporosis-specific economic evaluation. The recommendations are intended for researchers in the field of osteoporosis, as well as to help decision makers, reviewers and editors assess the quality of economic studies."

He added: "These osteoporosis-specific recommendations should be viewed as supplemental to general and national guidelines for economic evaluations. We encourage health economists and researchers in the field to make use of the recommendations and thereby to improve the transparency and comparability of their work. By promoting high-quality methodology standards, we hope to increase the use of economic evaluations by decision makers - which ultimately should lead to a more effective allocation of resources to our patients with osteoporosis."
-end-
The paper has been endorsed by the Scientific Advisory Committee of ESCEO, the Committee of Scientific Advisors and the Committee of National Societies of IOF, the US National Osteoporosis Foundation and Osteoporosis Canada.

Reference: Hiligsmann, M., Reginster, JY., Tosteson, A. et al. Recommendations for the conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis: outcomes of an Experts' consensus meeting organized by the ESCEO and the US Branch of IOF. Osteoporos Int (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-018-4744-x

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00198-018-4744-x

About ESCEO

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) is a non-profit organization, dedicated to a close interaction between clinical scientists dealing with rheumatic disorders, pharmaceutical industry developing new compounds in this field, regulators responsible for the registration of such drugs and health policy makers, to integrate the management of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis within the comprehensive perspective of health resources utilization. The objective of ESCEO is to provide practitioners with the latest clinical and economic information, allowing them to organize their daily practice, in an evidence-based medicine perspective, with a cost-conscious perception. http://www.esceo.org

About IOF

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) is the world's largest nongovernmental organization dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and related musculoskeletal diseases. IOF members, including committees of scientific researchers as well as 240 patient, medical and research societies in 99 locations, work together to make fracture prevention and healthy mobility a global health care priority. http://www.iofbonehealth.org; http://www.facebook.com/@iofbonehealth

International Osteoporosis Foundation

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