Praise for polymer science

December 06, 2016

UC Santa Barbara engineer Glenn Fredrickson has received the 2016 William H. Walker Award for Excellence in Contributions to Chemical Engineering Literature from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). Presented annually since 1936, the award is named for William H. Walker, one of the American pioneers of chemical engineering practice and principles.

"This major award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers recognizes Glenn Fredrickson's immense and impactful contributions to the chemical engineering literature, particularly with respect to polymer theory and simulations," said Rachel Segalman, the Edward Noble Kramer Professor and chair of UCSB's Department of Chemical Engineering. "We are incredibly proud of Glenn's achievements and thrilled that they go so much further than the literature contributions recognized by this award to contributions to UCSB, where he is an incredible colleague and a cornerstone of many exciting collaborations."

Fredrickson's computational field theory techniques have revolutionized the study of soft materials and complex fluids, most notably in self-assembling polymers and block copolymers. Known as field-theoretic simulations (FTS), these techniques are significant not only for their importance to molecular thermodynamics but also for their engineering impact on directed self-assembly -- an emerging lithographic technology for semiconductor devices. Companies such as Intel and Samsung are developing their next-generation lithographic processes based on FTS software tools developed by UCSB's Fredrickson Research Group.

After contributing an influential 2002 article to the journal Macromolecules that explained the full framework of FTS, Frederickson, the Mitsubishi Chemical Chair in Functional Materials at UCSB, four years later published the Oxford University Press monograph "The Equilibrium Theory of Inhomogeneous Polymers." The book, which unified the field of nonhomogeneous polymer theory and simulation, has become the standard reference for both self-consistent field theory and Frederickson's more powerful FTS.
-end-
Frederickson earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Florida in 1980 and his master's degree and doctorate from Stanford University in 1981 and 1984, respectively. He worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories before joining the faculty at UCSB in 1990. In 2014, Frederickson was appointed chief technology officer and member of the board of Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings Corporation in Tokyo.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the AIChE, the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His other honors include the Collaboration Success Award from the Council for Chemical Research, the Cooperative Research Award in Polymer Science and Engineering from the American Chemical Society, and the Polymer Physics Prize from the American Physical Society.

University of California - Santa Barbara

Related Chemical Engineering Articles from Brightsurf:

Strain engineering of 2D semiconductor and graphene
Strain engineering can significantly manipulate the two-dimensional (2D) materials' electronic and optical properties, which endow it the potential applications in optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity

Next frontier in bacterial engineering
A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering.

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.

Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.

Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering.

Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.

Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.

A new way to do metabolic engineering
University of Illinois researchers have created a novel metabolic engineering method that combines transcriptional activation, transcriptional interference, and gene deletion, and executes them simultaneously, making the process faster and easier.

Read More: Chemical Engineering News and Chemical Engineering Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.