Nav: Home

'Hangxiety' higher in shy people

December 06, 2018

Very shy people are more likely to suffer "hangxiety" - anxiety during a hangover - than their extrovert friends, new research shows.

In a study of almost 100 social drinkers with either high or low levels of shyness, drinking about six units of alcohol slightly decreased anxiety in highly shy people.

But the next day, this slight relaxation was replaced by a significant increase in anxiety - a state of "hangxiety" among the shy drinkers.

The researchers, from the University of Exeter and UCL, also found a strong link between this hangxiety and higher scores on the AUDIT test which is used to identify alcohol use disorder (AUD) in highly shy people.

"We know that many people drink to ease anxiety felt in social situations, but this research suggests that this might have rebound consequences the next day, with more shy individuals more likely to experience this, sometimes debilitating, aspect of hangover," said Professor Celia Morgan, of the University of Exeter. "These findings also suggest that hangxiety in turn might be linked to people's chance of developing a problem with alcohol."

First author Beth Marsh, of UCL, said: "While alcohol use is actually going down, there are still 600,000 dependent drinkers in the UK.

"And while statistics show that, overall, people are drinking less, those with lower levels of health and wellbeing - perhaps including people experiencing anxiety - are still often doing so."

Professor Morgan added: "It's about accepting being shy or an introvert. This might help transition people away from heavy alcohol use. It's a positive trait. It's OK to be quiet."

Participants in the study, who were tested at home, were assigned at random either to drink or to stay sober.

Baseline measures of shyness, social phobia and AUD were taken, and anxiety levels were tested again during the evening and the following morning.

The paper, published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, is entitled: "Shyness, alcohol use disorders and 'hangxiety': A naturalistic study of social drinkers."

University of Exeter

Related Alcohol Articles:

This is your brain on alcohol (video)
It's almost time to ring in 2017. And since most New Year's celebrations include alcohol, Reactions' latest episode explains the chemistry behind its effects -- drunkenness, frequent bathroom breaks and occasionally poor decision-making.
Heavy alcohol use changes adolescents' brain
Heavy alcohol use during adolescence alters the development of brain, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital.
Maryland's 2011 alcohol sales tax reduced alcohol sales, study suggests
Maryland's 2011 increase in the alcohol sales tax appears to have led to fewer purchases of beer, wine and liquor in the state, suggesting reduced alcohol use, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research indicates.
Alcohol related deaths are likely to increase after cuts in alcohol taxation
Alcohol related deaths are most likely set to increase in England as incomes outstrip rises in taxation, argue experts in The BMJ today.
Alcohol aromatherapy eases nausea in the ER
Nauseated patients in the emergency department who sniffed pads saturated with isopropyl alcohol were twice as likely to obtain relief from their symptoms as nauseated patients who sniffed pads saturated with saline solution, according to a study published online today in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Isopropyl Alcohol Nasal Inhalation for Nausea in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial').
Alcohol ads linked to teen alcohol brand choices
Overall exposure to brand-specific alcohol advertising is a significant predictor of underage youth alcohol brand consumption, with youth ages 13 to 20 more than five times more likely to consume brands that advertise on national television and 36 percent more likely to consume brands that advertise in national magazines compared to brands that don't advertise in these media.
Should women consume alcohol during pregnancy?
In The BMJ this week, experts discuss the evidence and current guidelines on the controversial topic of alcohol consumption during pregnancy.
The Lancet: Harmful alcohol use linked with increased risk of alcohol-related cancers and injury
A new study of alcohol use in countries of all income levels shows that current use increases the risk of alcohol-related cancers and injury, with no reduction in risk of mortality or cardiovascular disease overall.
Web interventions for alcohol misuse
A systematic evidence review published in Annals of Internal Medicine finds that low-intensity electronic interventions may slightly reduce alcohol consumption among adults and college students, but may be ineffective for reducing binge-drinking frequency and the negative social consequences associated with alcohol misuse.
Marijuana users substitute alcohol at 21
A recent study looked at marijuana and alcohol use in people between the ages of 18 and 24.

Related Alcohol Reading:

Pigments of Your Imagination: Creating with Alcohol Inks
by Cathy Taylor (Author)

Alcohol Explained
by William Porter (Author)

The Alcohol Experiment: A 30-day, Alcohol-Free Challenge to Interrupt Your Habits and Help You Take Control
by Annie Grace (Author)

Alcohol Lied to Me: The Intelligent Way to Escape Alcohol Addiction
by Craig Beck (Author)

Drink: A Cultural History of Alcohol
by Iain Gately (Author)

Alcohol Ink Dreamscaping Quick Reference Guide: Relaxing, intuitive art-making for all levels
by June Rollins (Author)

Treating Alcohol and Drug Problems in Psychotherapy Practice: Doing What Works
by Arnold M. Washton (Author), Joan E. Zweben (Author)

Clinical Supervision Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counseling
by David J. Powell (Author)

Crafting with Alcohol Inks: Creative Projects for Colorful Art, Furniture, Fashion, Gifts and Holiday Decor
by Allison Murray (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Circular
We're told if the economy is growing, and if we keep producing, that's a good thing. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers explore circular systems that regenerate and re-use what we already have. Guests include economist Kate Raworth, environmental activist Tristram Stuart, landscape architect Kate Orff, entrepreneur David Katz, and graphic designer Jessi Arrington.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#504 The Art of Logic
How can mathematics help us have better arguments? This week we spend the hour with "The Art of Logic in an Illogical World" author, mathematician Eugenia Cheng, as she makes her case that the logic of mathematics can combine with emotional resonance to allow us to have better debates and arguments. Along the way we learn a lot about rigorous logic using arguments you're probably having every day, while also learning a lot about our own underlying beliefs and assumptions.