Roger Kornberg to present lecture at the Joint Biophysical Society/IUPAB Meeting

December 07, 2007

Bethesda, MD-The 7,800-member Biophysical Society and the International Biophysics Congress will host Roger Kornberg at a Joint Meeting in Long Beach, California, February 2-6, 2008. Kornberg, a professor at the Stanford School of Medicine, won The Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2006 "for his studies of the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription."

Dr. Kornberg has been named the National Lecturer for the Biophysical Society and the Aharon Katzir-Kachalski Lecture Awardee by IUPAB. His keynote address, "The Molecular Basis of Eukaryotic Transport" will take place on Monday, February 4th at 8:00 PM in the Long Beach Convention Center.

The registration fee for the Annual meeting includes entrance to the National Lecture. Those not registered for the Annual meeting can buy tickets for the lecture onsite for $25.
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The Biophysical Society's Annual Meeting is the world's largest meeting of biophysicists -over 6,000 attendees are expected. Over 3000 scientific abstracts have already been submitted for presentation at this event. Complete information about the Meeting and about Dr. Kornberg's lecture can be found at http://www.biophysics.org/meetings/2008/.

The International Union for Pure and Applied Biophysics is a member of the ICSU (International Council for Science) family. Affiliated to it are the national adhering bodies of 50 countries. Its function is to support research and teaching in biophysics. Its principal regular activity is the triennial International Congresses and General Assemblies.

The Biophysical Society, founded in 1956, is a professional, scientific society established to encourage development and dissemination of knowledge in biophysics. The Society promotes growth in this expanding field through its annual meeting, monthly journal, and committee and outreach activities. Its members are located throughout the U.S. and the world, where they teach and conduct research in colleges, universities, laboratories, government agencies, and industry.

For further information and press registration, contact: Ellen R. Weiss. 301-634-7176/eweiss@biophysics.org

Biophysical Society

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