Voluntary health organizations, publishers announce major information initiative

December 08, 2004

New York, NY, December 8, 2004- Scientific publishers and the nation's leading voluntary health organizations have announced a groundbreaking initiative to help patients and caregivers close a critical information gap.

Scheduled to launch as a pilot project in Spring 2005, patientINFORM (www.patientinform.org) is a free, online service dedicated to disseminating original medical research directly to consumers. A collaborative effort of leading voluntary health organizations, scholarly and medical publishers, medical societies, and information professionals, patientINFORM will provide patients and their caregivers with online access to up-to-date, reliable research for specific diseases. Participating voluntary health organizations will integrate the information into materials created for patients and link to free full-text research articles and additional selected material on journal websites.

"Not only will patientINFORM connect patients and their caregivers with the latest research, it will help them to put it into context. By making it easier to understand research findings, patientINFORM will empower patients to have a more productive dialogue with their physicians and make well-informed decisions about care," said Harmon J. Eyre, M.D., national chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society.

patientINFORM will initially focus on three diseases, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease, through the participation of three voluntary health organizations: The American Cancer Society (ACS), the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and American Heart Association (AHA); more than 20 publishers (see attached list); the International Association of STM Publishers; the Association of American Publishers/Professional & Scholarly Publishers; the Welch Medical Library at The Johns Hopkins University, and MedLinePlus (part of the National Institutes of Health's National Library of Medicine).

This groundbreaking initiative is being driven by recent trends indicating that public awareness of clinical research, heightened by media coverage and fueled by the spread of broadband Internet, has led more and more patients to go online to find the latest information about treatment options. Still, even many knowledgeable consumers can find it difficult to fully understand, evaluate, and make sound decisions based on what they learn from their Internet research.

"The health literacy problem has been called a 'silent epidemic' because many patients are embarrassed or intimidated and do not seek help to understand difficult or complicated information. The result is that a crucial part of their medical care is missing, and so they put their health at risk," said Richard Kahn, Ph.D., chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association.

Under the patientINFORM web-based pilot project, when patients, their caregivers, or others visit the voluntary health organization websites with general questions and to read news stories and other web content created by the organizations to help interpret the latest research, they will also have the option of being connected directly to the source through links to free full text of the research articles on the journal websites. Healthcare consumers will be able to access selected journal articles as soon as they are published. Each health organization's website will be listed on www.patientinform.org (see note attached).

Later phases of patientINFORM will extend services to cover a wider range of medical conditions and draw upon the offerings of a broader group of publishers.

"patientINFORM's motto, Access + Interpretation=Understanding + Empowerment underscores the guiding principle of this initiative," explained Rose Marie Robertson, MD, the chief science officer of the American Heart Association. "The active involvement of the three largest and most trusted voluntary health organizations in the world will help patients and caregivers understand and act upon the latest research on the diseases and conditions that afflict millions of Americans."

Participating publishers will provide the voluntary health organizations with increased online access to their peer-reviewed biomedical journals immediately upon publication. Content from back issues of scholarly journals will also be available to the groups, broadening access to include a vast array of research articles. The groups will be able to search the most current American, European, and other international research to help them identify relevant advances on specific diseases and treatments which they will then be able to pass on to patients.

About the American Cancer Society The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service. No matter who you are, we can help. For more information, visit: www.cancer.org.

About the American Diabetes Association

The American Diabetes Association is the nation's leading nonprofit health organization providing diabetes research, information and advocacy. Founded in 1940, the American Diabetes Association conducts programs in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, reaching hundreds of communities. The mission of the Association is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. To fulfill this mission, the American Diabetes Association funds research, publishes scientific findings, provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their families, health professionals and the public. The Association is also actively involved in advocating for scientific research and for the rights of people with diabetes. For more information visit: www.diabetes.org or 1-800-DIABETES.

About the American Heart Association Since 1924 the American Heart Association has helped protect people of all ages and ethnicities from the ravages of heart disease and stroke. These diseases, the nation's No. 1 and No. 3 killers, claim more than 930,000 American lives a year. The association invested more than $407 million in fiscal year 2002-03 for research, professional and public education, advocacy, and community service programs so people across America can live stronger, longer lives. For more information visit www.americanheart.org.
-end-
Editor's Note: The URL "patientinform.org" will go live with more information before the pilot launches formally.

Initial participants include:

Voluntary Health Organizations
American Cancer Society
American Diabetes Association
American Heart Association

Publishers
American Association for the Advancement of Science
American Association for Cancer Research
American Cancer Society
American Diabetes Association
American Heart Association
American Medical Association
American Physiological Association
American Roentgen Ray Society
American Society of Hematology
Annals of Internal Medicine
Blackwell Publishing
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Elsevier
Massachusetts Medical Society
Nature Publishing Group
Oxford University Press
Society of Nuclear Medicine
Springer
Wiley
Wolters Kluwer Health

Other Organizations

Association of American Publishers/Professional & Scholarly Publishers
International Association of Scientific, Technical, & Medical Publishers
Johns Hopkins University Welch Medical Library
National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus, part of the National Institutes of Health

Contacts:

Maurice Long,
c/o Susan Spilka
Wiley
201-748-6147
sspilka@wiley.com

David Sampson
American Cancer Society
213-368-8523
david.sampson@cancer.org

Diane Tuncer
American Diabetes Association
703-299-5510
dtuncer@diabetes.org

Stephen Prudhomme
American Heart Association
214-706-1582
stephen.prudhomme@heart.org

Wiley

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