ACS Webinars focus on chemistry in your kitchen this holiday season

December 08, 2010

WASHINGTON, Dec. 6, 2010 -- News media and others interested in the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars™ focusing on kitchen chemistry.

Scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 9, from 2 - 3 p.m. EST, the free ACS Webinar™ features Shirley Corriher, author of CookWise and BakeWise, and Peter Barham, author of The Science of Cooking, who will give chemistry tips that can transform your kitchen into a workshop of culinary delights for the holidays.

ACS Webinars™ connect you with experts and global thought leaders in the chemical sciences, management and business to address current topics of interest to scientific and engineering professionals. Each webinar includes a short presentation followed by a question and answer session. News media and scientists can tune into the conference without charge but must register in advance at http://www.acswebinars.org/kitchenchemistry2010.

Participants will learn:Corriher has appeared on many TV shows, including ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live with Snoop Dog as her fry chef. She has won many awards and for over 40 years, Corriher has solved cooking problems for everyone from home cooks to Julia Child. She has a B.A. in chemistry from Vanderbilt University, where she was also a biochemist at the medical school.

Barham is a professor of physics at Bristol University in the United Kingdom, honorary professor of molecular gastronomy in the life sciences faculty of the University of Copenhagen, and honorary research associate at the Animal Demography Unit in Zoology at the University of Cape Town. He researches fundamental polymer physics and food science. Barham is helping to create research and teaching activities in the new and emerging area of molecular gastronomy.
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The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

American Chemical Society

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