Nav: Home

Hip osteoarthritis may not appear on x-ray

December 08, 2015

(Boston ) -- In the majority of cases, hip x-rays are not reliable for diagnosing hip osteoarthritis (OA), and can delay the treatment of this debilitating disease.

These findings are the first to evaluate the diagnostic performance of an x-ray in patients with clinical signs and symptoms of classic OA. The study appears in the British Medical Journal.

Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a significant source of morbidity causing pain, difficulty walking, and disability. More than 330,000 hip replacements are performed in the U.S. at a huge cost to the healthcare system. The population of people over age 60 has more than doubled in the past 30 years, and the total cost of OA (both treatment and complications) amount to $185.5 billion annually and is expected to rise exponentially.

Researchers looked at the Framingham Osteoarthritis and Osteoarthritis Initiative studies, with nearly 4,500 participants. In the Framingham study, only 16 percent of patients with hip pain had radiographic hip OA, and only 21 percent of hips with radiographic OA had hip pain. Results of the Osteoarthritis Initiative were similar with nine percent and 24 percent, respectively. In both study populations, hip pain was not present in many patients with radiographic OA, and many with hip pain did not have imaging evidence of hip OA.

"The majority of older subjects with high suspicion for clinical hip osteoarthritis did not have radiographic hip osteoarthritis, suggesting that many older persons with hip osteoarthritis might be missed if diagnosticians relied on hip radiographs to determine if hip pain was due to osteoarthritis," explained corresponding author Chan Kim, MD, instructor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.

Missing the diagnosis of hip OA has consequences. According to Kim, up to 10 percent of patients with OA do not meet adequate physical activity recommendations, and are associated with having higher risk of developing heart or lung disease, diabetes, obesity and falls. "Given these findings, patients with suspected hip OA should be treated regardless of x-ray confirmation."
-end-
Funding for this study was provided by grants from the National Institutes of Health (AR47785, NIH AG18393, NIH AR47785, NIAMS BAA-NHLBI-AR-10-06), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (contract No. HHSN268201000019C), as well as private partners including Merck Research Laboratories; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, GlaxoSmithKline; and Pfizer, Inc.

Boston University Medical Center

Related Osteoarthritis Articles:

Cross-species links identified for osteoarthritis
New research from the University of Liverpool, published today in the journal NPJ Systems Biology and Applications, has identified 'cell messages' that could help identify the early stages of osteoarthritis.
Findings do not support steroid injections for knee osteoarthritis
Among patients with knee osteoarthritis, an injection of a corticosteroid every three months over two years resulted in significantly greater cartilage volume loss and no significant difference in knee pain compared to patients who received a placebo injection, according to a study published by JAMA.
Osteoarthritis could be prevented with good diet and exercise
Osteoarthritis can potentially be prevented with a good diet and regular exercise, a new expert review published in the Nature Reviews Rheumatology reports.
Hand osteoarthritis is a common condition
A new study estimates that the lifetime risk of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis is 40 percent, and nearly one in two women and one in four men will develop the condition, which affects hand strength and function and causes disability in activities of daily living.
Noisy knees may be an early sign of knee osteoarthritis
A new study using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, a multi-center observational study of nearly 3500 participants, indicates that people who hear grating, cracking, or popping sounds in or around their knee joint may be at increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis.
Improvements in ACL surgery may help prevent knee osteoarthritis
Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee frequently leads to early-onset osteoarthritis, a painful condition that can occur even if the patient has undergone ACL reconstruction to prevent its onset.
Clinical trial for new innovative osteoarthritis drug
The University of Liverpool, in partnership with AKL Research and Development Ltd, is to lead on a clinical trial to test a potential new drug treatment for osteoarthritis.
Blood test for early osteoarthritis diagnosis unveiled
Patients could soon be diagnosed with early-stage arthritis several years before the onset of physical and irreversible symptoms, thanks to a new test developed by researchers at the University of Warwick.
Osteoarthritis just as severe as rheumatoid arthritis
Rheumatologists more likely to underestimate clinical status of their OA patients than their RA patients
Tissue fluid flow can reveal onset of osteoarthritis
Reflecting the overall structural alterations in the tissue, changes in the flow of interstitial fluid in articular cartilage could be an indicator revealing the onset of osteoarthritis, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.

Related Osteoarthritis Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...