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Max Planck Neuroscience launches research and news site for scientific community

December 08, 2016

From the world's most progressive researchers on the cusp of scientific discovery, the Max Planck Neuroscience (MP Neuro) website now brings the future of neuroscience to our fingertips.

"This brand new digital hub presents all neuroscience content from the entire Max Planck Society network," says Dr. David Fitzpatrick, CEO and scientific director for Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience. "Research summaries, publications, news, training programs, video/audio, events - the MP Neuro website is a user-friendly resource for the entire scientific community to use, learn and share."

The MP Neuro research and news site, which made its unveiling at the 2016 Society for Neuroscience conference, thoroughly explores thought leadership and discoveries in areas listed below:
  • Brain Disorders and Injury
  • Cognition
  • Development
  • Integrative Physiology and Behavior
  • Motivation and Emotion
  • Motor Systems
  • Neural Excitability, Synapses, and Glia
  • Sensory Systems
  • Techniques

Representing the Max Planck Society culture of fostering the collaborative exchange of scientific ideas, the MP Neuro website provides a portal for research findings to be shared publicly with scholars, universities and other organizations around the globe. Only with this necessary foundation of knowledge, can researchers develop treatments and cures for brain disorders, such as autism, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.
-end-
MP Neuro - more than meets the mind

The Max Planck Society brings together hundreds of neuroscience researchers throughout the world, equipping them with the best tools and resources to explore some of the most complex issues facing all facets of brain science. This collective knowledge and expertise promotes creative, interdisciplinary approaches - allowing Max Planck scientists to make significant advances in the field and develop innovative technologies and techniques to advance neuroscience research across the globe.

To learn more about Max Planck Neuroscience or sign-up for news, research and training updates, visit http://maxplanckneuroscience.org/.

Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience

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