Nav: Home

Tumor found in a 255-million-year-old mammalian ancestor

December 08, 2016

A tumor in a 255-million-year-old mammalian ancestor called a gorgonopsian is detailed in a new research letter published online by JAMA Oncology.

The research letter by Megan R. Whitney, M.Sc., of the University of Washington, Seattle, and coauthors reports on a microscopic study of part of a gorgonopsian's jaw, which included examining wafer-thin slices of the specimen.

Ectopic toothlike structures that resembled miniature teeth were seen, an ancient condition that the authors suggest resembles compound odontoma, which is a common type of tumor although what causes it is not well understood. In humans, compound odontoma is characterized by miniature teeth that can cause the resorption of the functional tooth.

Odontomas were previously unknown in deep premammalian evolutionary history, according to the article.

"Recognition of odontoma in such a distant relative of humans suggests that this condition is unlikely related to characteristics of mammalian dentition [teeth] or physiologic features but rather evolved much earlier in vertebrate evolution," the report conclude.
-end-
For more details and the study findings, please visit the For The Media website.

(JAMA Oncol. Published online December 8, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.5417; available pre-embargo at the For The Media website.)

Editor's Note: The article contains funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Tumor Articles:

Tumor induction from a distance
Researchers suggest that neighboring tissues can send signals inducing tumorigenesis.
Injecting activator of a powerful tumor suppressor directly into the cancer increases tumor destruction, decreases toxicity
Directly injecting a tumor with an agent that activates a natural, powerful tumor suppressor enhances the drug's capacity to attack the tumor both locally and where it spreads, scientists report in the journal Cancer Research.
Tumor cells get stiff before becoming invasive
A study published now on Nature Communications shows that breast cancer cells undergo a stiffening state prior to acquiring malignant features and becoming invasive.
WSU researchers deliver first 'nanotherapeutics' to tumor
For the first time, WSU researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell.
New insights into the tumor metabolism
Tumors, inflammation and circulatory disorders locally disturb the body's acid-base balance.
Are tumor cells glutamine addicts?
Many tumors are thought to depend on glutamine, suggesting glutamine deprivation as therapeutic approach, but a new study shows that this effect might have been overestimated.
Targeting a tumor trigger
Many cancer patients that receive chemotherapy go into remission at first, but relapse after treatment is discontinued.
Scientists use tumor-derived dendritic cells to slow tumor growth
In the human body, so-called dendritic cells are responsible for activating our immune system.
Anti-tumor synergy
Biocompatible nanocapsules, loaded with an amino acid and equipped with an enzyme now combine two anti-tumor strategies into a synergistic treatment concept.
The antibody that normalizes tumor vessels
IBS scientists discover that their antisepsis antibody also reduces glioma, lung and breast cancer progression in mice.

Related Tumor Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#520 A Closer Look at Objectivism
This week we broach the topic of Objectivism. We'll be speaking with Keith Lockitch, senior fellow at the Ayn Rand Institute, about the philosophy of Objectivism as it's taught through Ayn Rand's writings. Then we'll speak with Denise Cummins, cognitive scientist, author and fellow at the Association for Psychological Science, about the impact of Objectivist ideology on society. Related links: This is what happens when you take Ayn Rand seriously Another Critic Who Doesn’t Care What Rand Thought or Why She Thought It, Only That She’s Wrong Quote is from "A Companion to Ayn Rand"