UT Southwestern scientist receives international award for pediatric research

December 09, 2005

Dr. Eric Olson, chairman of molecular biology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has won the fourth annual Pollin Prize in Pediatric Research, a lifetime achievement award.

The Pollin Prize recognizes outstanding contributions in biomedical or public-health research related to the health of children.

Dr. Olson shares the $100,000 international prize with Dr. Abraham Rudolph, emeritus professor of pediatrics and senior staff member of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the University of California, San Francisco. They also will split and disburse an additional $100,000 to young investigators working in their fields.

Dr. Olson was chosen for his discovery of the genes that control formation of the heart, providing insight into congenital heart disease and possible diagnosis and treatment, according to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, which administers the prize. The Pollin Prize was created by Irene and Abe Pollin and their family of Chevy Chase, Md., and is funded by the Linda and Kenneth Pollin Foundation.

"I am honored to receive the Pollin Prize and to share it with Abraham Rudolph, an icon in pediatric cardiology," Dr. Olson said. "Dr. Rudolph's pioneering work on techniques for treatment of circulatory disorders in children beautifully complements the work from my laboratory on the network of genes that controls cardiovascular development.

"I am also especially grateful to the amazing group of students and young scientists I have been so fortunate to work with during my career in Texas. They deserve the lion's share of credit for this award."

Dr. Olson directs the Nancy B. and Jake L. Hamon Center for Basic Research in Cancer and the Nearburg Family Center for Basic Research in Pediatric Oncology. He holds the Robert A. Welch Distinguished Chair in Science and the Annie and Willie Nelson Professorship in Stem Cell Research. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

"These two scientists and their far-reaching research have advanced our understanding of the causes of congenital cardiac anomalies and their treatment," said Dr. Herbert Pardes, president and chief executive officer of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. "Conditions that were often a death sentence are now effectively treated, and often entirely prevented."

The heart is the first organ to form and function in the embryo. Abnormalities in heart development result in congenital heart disease, the most common birth defect and the leading noninfectious cause of death in children under 1 year of age.
-end-
This news release is available on our World Wide Web home page at http://www.utsouthwestern.edu/home/news/index.html

To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via e-mail, subscribe at www.utsouthwestern.edu/receivenews

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Related Congenital Heart Disease Articles from Brightsurf:

Low risk of COVID-19 infection found among people with congenital heart disease
Results of a retrospective analysis suggest that people born with a heart defect who developed COVID-19 symptoms had a low risk of moderate or severe COVID-19 infection, according to a new article published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association.

New method for in utero 4D imaging of baby hearts may aid diagnosis of congenital heart disease
Researchers at King's College London have developed a new method for helping detect congenital heart disease of a baby in pregnant mothers using MRI.

Gout treatment may aid patients with congenital heart disease
A drug used to treat gout, probenecid, may improve heart function in individuals with a particular heart defect, according to results from a small pilot study run by a University of Cincinnati researcher.

Stakeholders update newborn screening guidelines for critical congenital heart disease
A distinguished panel of medical experts, state and federal health officials, and congenital heart disease parent advocates published recommended updates to the current American Academy of Pediatrics' protocol for detecting critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborn babies using pulse oximetry.

Congenital heart disease more deadly in low-income countries
Even though mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) has declined over the last three decades as diagnosis and treatments have advanced, a new study shows that the chances for a child to survive a CHD diagnosis significantly differs based on the country where he or she is born.

Telehealth effectively diagnoses/manages fetal congenital heart disease in rural patients
A recent study of 368 pregnant mothers, led by Bettina Cuneo, MD, director of perinatal cardiology and fetal cardiac telemedicine at Children's Hospital Colorado, found that fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) was correctly identified and successfully managed according to evidence-based risk stratification.

Uncorrected congenital heart disease may lead to increased risks in pregnant women
Pregnant women with congenital heart disease (CHD) who have not had surgery to repair their cardiac condition are more likely to experience cardiac events or maternal death, especially those with certain conditions in emerging countries, according to a study published Oct.

A new framework to study congenital heart defects
In a new study published in the scientific journal Nature, a team of researchers at the Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg, reveal for the first time the full spectrum of cells that come together to make a heart at the earliest stages of embryo formation.

Risk of cancer among children, young adults with congenital heart disease
National registry data in Sweden were used in this study that assessed the risk of developing cancer in children and young adults with congenital heart disease compared with healthy people in the general population from birth to age 41.

Congenital heart defects vastly increase risk of heart problems later in life
An infant born with a relatively simple heart defect is far more likely to develop heart problems as an adult, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered.

Read More: Congenital Heart Disease News and Congenital Heart Disease Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.