Aorta: A novel free aortic surgery app for cardiologists and cardiac surgeons

December 09, 2014

Montreal, December 9, 2014 - Three cardiac surgeons from the Montreal Heart Institute, Dr. Yoan Lamarche, Dr. Ismail El-Hamamsy and Dr. Philippe Demers, are behind Aorta, a free app that provides specialists with patient-specific recommendations for aortic replacement surgery based on the latest scientific guidelines.

The easy-to-use app is a useful tool which helps physicians tailor clinical decisions to their patients. Aorta was developed for cardiologists, cardiac surgeons as well as family physicians caring with patients with aortic aneurysms, ie, abnormal dilatation of the aorta. Through a short series of key questions, the app provides physicians with the treatment recommendations for their individual patients based on the latest guidelines on the management of aortic aneurysms published by major scientific organisations: the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the European Society of Cardiology.

"Aorta is an ace up your sleeve when you need to make an informed decision about whether a surgical procedure is necessary," explains Dr. Lamarche. "It's an important complement to the clinical expertise of specialists because it gives access to all of the most recent guidelines in just a few seconds, makes it possible to offer patients customized treatment, and provides concrete information that can help doctors and patients reach a joint decision about the best timing for surgery. In essence, it brings us a step closer to true individualized medicine"

The application was made possible in part thanks to the financial support provided by the Montreal Heart Institute, the Montreal Heart Institute Foundation, and the Department of Surgery of Université de Montréal. Aorta is available as a free app for iOS and Android and online at http://www.aorticsurgeryguidelines.com.
-end-
Dr. Yoan Lamarche is available for interviews.

Screenshots of the application are available upon request.

About the Montreal Heart Institute

Founded in 1954 by Dr. Paul David, the Montreal Heart Institute constantly aims for the highest standards of excellence in the cardiovascular field through its leadership in clinical and basic research, ultra-specialized care, professional training and prevention. It is part of the broad network of health excellence made up of Université de Montréal and its affiliated institutions.

About the Montreal Heart Institute Foundation

The mission of the Montreal Heart Institute Foundation is to raise and administer funds to support the Institute's priority and innovative projects and help its fight against cardiovascular disease, the number-one cause of death worldwide. Since its creation in 1977, the Foundation has donated almost $200 million to the Montreal Heart Institute.

Information:

Julie Chevrette
Communications and Promotion Officer
Montreal Heart Institute Foundation
Phone: 514-376-3330, extension 2641 | julie.chevrette@icm-mhi.org
facebook.com/institutcardiologiemontreal | @ICMtl

Montreal Heart Institute

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