This week from AGU: Asteroid link to algal bloom, Earth and space data, & 3 new papers

December 09, 2015

GeoSpace

Dinosaur-killing asteroid may have caused global algal bloom, marine extinction

The asteroid impact suspected of killing the dinosaurs may also have triggered a global algal bloom that contributed to a massive marine extinction more than 60 million years ago, according to a study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

Making Earth and space science data matter

This is part of a new series of posts that highlight the importance of Earth and space science data and its contributions to society. This series is intended to demystify Earth and space science data, and share how this data shapes our understanding of the world.

Eos.org

UAE-Oman mountains give clues to oceanic Crust and mantle rocks

New research papers

Decadal trends of ocean and land carbon fluxes from a regional joint ocean-atmosphere inversion, Global Biogeochemical Cycles

Elevated shear strength of sediments on active margins: Evidence for seismic strengthening, Geophysical Research Letters

Distinct crustal isostasy trends east and west of the Rocky Mountain Front, Geophysical Research Letters
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Earth may always have been wet
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Probing materials at deep-Earth conditions to decipher Earth's evolutionary tale
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What is the origin of water on Earth?
Led by Cédric Gillmann -- Université libre de Bruxelles, ULB, funded by the EoS project ET-HoME, a team of researchers demonstrate that the water we are now enjoying on Earth has been there since its formation.

How and when was carbon distributed in the Earth?
A magma ocean existing during the core formation is thought to have been highly depleted in carbon due to its high-siderophile (iron loving) behavior.

Deep-earth diamonds reveal primordial rock source in Earth's mantle
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