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UH receives $66 million in-kind software grant from Siemens PLM Software

December 09, 2016

The University of Houston Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture and Design today announced it has received an in-kind software grant from Siemens PLM Software, with a commercial value of more than $66 million. Siemens PLM Software is a leading global provider of product lifecycle management (PLM) software and services. The in-kind grant awarded to the Industrial Design program gives students access to the same technology companies around the world depend on to develop innovative products in a variety of industries, including automotive, aerospace, machinery, shipbuilding, and high-tech electronics.

Graduates with this type of software training are highly recruited candidates for advanced technology jobs. "By using the same technology in the classroom that is used by companies all over the world to develop a wide variety of products, our students gain important real-world experience during their studies that will serve them well after graduation," said College of Architecture and Design Dean Patricia Belton Oliver.

Jorge Camba, the assistant professor of Industrial Design who submitted the grant proposal, says this software could be a game-changer for the students. "We're very grateful to Siemens for such an amazing donation. Hopefully it will take our designs and projects to the next level. We'll be able to work with much more complex and sophisticated designs than before," said Camba.

The in-kind grant was provided by the Siemens PLM Software's academic program that delivers PLM software for schools at every academic level. "It's great software that integrates design, engineering and manufacturing, so the students are getting the whole picture of what the product development process is," said Dr. EunSook Kwon, Director of the Industrial Design program.

The in-kind grant for the University of Houston includes the following Siemens PLM Software: Teamcenter® portfolio, the world's most widely used digital lifecycle management software; NXTM software, a leading integrated solution for computer-aided design, manufacturing and engineering (CAD/CAM/CAE); Solid Edge® software is an intuitive product development platform for accelerating all aspects of product creation, including 3D design, simulation, visualization, manufacturing, and design management.

"Leveraging the advanced technology provided by Siemens PLM Software, the University of Houston will provide their students with the training they need to become highly recruited graduates," said Dora Smith, global director, Academic Partner Program, Siemens PLM Software.
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University of Houston

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