New therapeutic options for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients

December 10, 2007

ATLANTA -- Mayo Clinic researchers today presented results of a phase II trial of myeloma induction therapy -- a first step therapy designed to reduce cancer cells numbers -- with cyclophosphamide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (Cybor-D) showing an improved response over the traditional lenalidomide-dexamethasone (L-Dex) therapy. The findings were reported by Craig B. Reeder, M.D., at the American Society of Hematology's annual meeting.

"For newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients, this new treatment provides a more frequent, rapid and deeper response when compared to earlier treatment options," says Dr. Reeder, a Mayo Clinic Cancer Center hematologist/oncologist and lead investigator of the study. "This is the first time we have studied this treatment in newly diagnosed patients with this condition. Compared with past therapies, this new treatment proved to be very successful."

The team studied 30 patients receiving Cybor-D in the trial. As a relevant contemporaneous control for speed and depth of response, researchers compared 34 patients treated on a recent Mayo Clinic trial of L-Dex. The findings showed that Cybor-D produced a rapid initial decline and percentage reduction in M protein (abnormal protein present in blood of myeloma patients) and a significantly higher rate of good or complete responses than L-Dex. Prophylactic use of acyclovir, a quinolone and antifungal prophylaxis was highly recommended for all patients on the study.
-end-
Other Mayo Clinic researchers contributing to the study included Rafael Fonseca, M.D.; Leif Bergsagel, M.D.; S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D.; Jacy Boesiger; Christine Chen; Martha Lacy, M.D.; Keith Stewart, M.B.Ch.B.; Joseph Hentz and Nicholas Pirooz. Researchers from Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, also contributed to the study.

Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma, also called myeloma, is an incurable plasma cell (white blood cells in bone marrow) cancer. The disease's cause is unknown. The American Cancer Society reports that nearly 20,000 people will have been diagnosed with myeloma in 2007 alone. Myeloma interferes with bone marrow function and the immune system, and can cause bone erosion, anemia, infection and possibly kidney failure.

For more information on hematology research at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, visit http://mayoresearch.mayo.edu/mayo/research/hematologic_malignancies.

To obtain the latest news releases from Mayo Clinic, go to www.mayoclinic.org/news. MayoClinic.com is available as a resource for your health stories.

Mayo Clinic

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