NASA satellites see Typhoon Bopha fizzle over weekend

December 10, 2012

Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite have watched the strong thunderstorms in Typhoon Bopha fizzle and shrink in area over the weekend as wind shear increased. Bopha has now dissipated in the South China Sea, just west of Luzon, Philippines.

NASA's Aqua satellite has been providing data on Bopha since the day it formed on Nov. 26. In the storm's last days, Aqua's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured infrared data of the storm and showed that cloud top temperatures warmed from Dec. 8 through Dec. 9 as cloud heights fell and thunderstorms lost their punch.

AIRS infrared data reveals where the coldest, highest cloud tops are located in a tropical cyclone. The coldest cloud tops indicate the strongest storms with the heaviest rain. On Dec. 8, AIRS data revealed a large area of strong thunderstorms surrounded the center of circulation as the storm skirted the west coast of Luzon, the northern Philippines. That same day, Bopha triggered more warnings for the Philippines.

Just one day before, Typhoon Bopha's maximum sustained winds were up to 110 knots (126 mph/203.7 kph), but increased wind shear started taking a toll on the storm. As Bopha moved closer to Luzon (northern Philippines), warnings were posted on Dec. 8. Public storm warning signal #2 was in effect in the Luzon provinces of Ilocos Norte & Sur and La Union; and Public storm warning signal #1 was in effect in the Luzon provinces of Cagayan, Calayan group of islands, Babuyan group of islands, Batanes group of islands, Abra, Apayao, Kalinga, Mt. Province, Benguet, Pangasinan. At 2100 UTC (4 p.m. EST/U.S.), Bopha's maximum sustained winds were near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph), so it was still a tropical storm. Overnight on Dec. 8 into Dec. 9, wind shear increased and Bopha weakened into a tropical depression.

By Dec. 9 at 0300 UTC (Dec. 8 at 10 p.m. EST/U.S.) the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final advisory on Bopha. At that time it was a tropical depression located near 18.3 north latitude and 119.2 east longitude, about 240 miles north-northwest of Manila, Philippines. The depression was moving slowly at 3 knots (3.4 mph/5.5 kph) to the northeast and dissipating under adverse atmospheric conditions just west of Luzon.

On Dec. 9, AIRS data showed quite a different picture as the strongest thunderstorms no longer surrounded the center of circulation and were blown away from the center because of wind shear. The area of strong thunderstorms had also diminished greatly, indicating a weakening storm. Wind shear had taken its toll on this once deadly storm and had blown it apart.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Wind Shear Articles from Brightsurf:

NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Gamma battered by wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Gamma being battered by outside winds in the south central Gulf of Mexico.

NASA finds wind shear displacing Lowell's strongest storms
NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of Tropical Storm Lowell that revealed the effects of outside winds battering the storm.

NASA finds Dolphin swimming against wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of a slightly elongated Tropical Storm Dolphin as it battled wind shear upon its approach to east central Japan.

NASA finds wind shear not letting up on Tropical Storm Vicky
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Vicky as it continued moving through the eastern North Atlantic Ocean fighting strong wind shear.

NASA finds Tropical Storm Rene less affected by wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Rene is it continued moving north though the central North Atlantic Ocean.

NASA's Aqua Satellite finds wind shear not letting up on Omar  
Tropical Depression Omar is one stubborn storm. Since it developed early in the week, it was being affected by wind shear.

NASA's Terra Satellite provides clear picture of wind shear battering Omar
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image that showed Tropical Storm Omar had weakened to a depression as it continued to be battered by strong upper level winds.

NASA sees wind shear still battering tropical storm Iselle
NASA infrared imagery shows wind shear continued to batter Tropical Storm Iselle in the Eastern Pacific Ocean for the second day.

NASA finds new Tropical Storm Iselle already battling wind shear
NASA infrared imagery shows that newly formed Tropical Storm Iselle is already battling for its life under wind shear.

NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Josephine
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Josephine east of the Lesser Antilles island chain.

Read More: Wind Shear News and Wind Shear Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.