Eight scientists awarded EMBO Installation Grants

December 10, 2014

HEIDELBERG, 10 December 2014 - EMBO announces the selection of eight scientists as recipients of the 2014 Installation Grants. The grants will help the scientists to relocate and set up laboratories in the Czech Republic, Poland, Portugal and Turkey.

"Our grants directly support young scientists going to participating member states to establish their own research groups. The awards help talented researchers to contribute to the strengthening of science in these countries and to build a successful research programme that can help to promote further collaborations," said Gerlind Wallon, Installation Grants Programme Manager and EMBO Deputy Director.

Of the grantees three will move to Turkey, two to the Czech Republic, two to Portugal and one to Poland. They will relocate to these countries from institutes and universities in Canada, Germany and the United States.

EMBO Installation Grants are awarded annually to strengthen science in selected Member States. The scheme is supported by these countries and a committee of EMBO Members selects the awardees.

The scientists receive 50,000 Euros annually for three to five years from their host countries. The eight grantees will also enter the network of EMBO Young Investigators, which helps them to integrate into the European scientific community.

71 group leaders have received support through EMBO Installation Grants since the start of the programme in 2006.

The next application deadline for EMBO Installation Grants is 15 April 2015.

2014 EMBO Installation Grantees

Nuno Barbosa-Morais, Portugal

Tolga Çukur, Turkey

Ana Domingos, Portugal

Peter Lukavsky, Czech Republic

Günes Özhan, Turkey

Pavel Plevka, Czech Republic

Piotr Setny, Poland

Gerhard Wingender, Turkey
-end-


EMBO

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