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The use of electrospun scaffolds in musculoskeletal tissue engineering

December 10, 2018

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that stabilizes the shoulder joint. It also helps in the motion of the shoulder. Rotator cuff tear is the most common condition involving ailing shoulders. It happens due to normal muscle tissue wear and tear by repeating the same motion again and again, without resting the muscles. Almost 15 percent of the elderly population (above 60) has this condition. This condition not only affects the quality of life of affected individuals, but at the same time it is a significant financial and social burden.

There is a high rate of failure anticipated while using the current operative techniques and repair adjuncts. New methods nitrating the condition are in consideration by medical research teams around the world. This review written by researchers from Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS), University of Oxford and the Division of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Cambridge, sheds light upon the advancements in electrospinning, which is a method that used in tissue engineering processes especially for the rotator cuff. Existing research from academic databases was referenced. Researchers noted the most the most common aspects of electrospinning for use in in tissue engineering are:
  • Techniques that will help improve the Nano-topographical properties of electro-spun scaffolds.

  • Usage of novel biological material in the manufacturing of electro-spun scaffolds.

  • Delivery of drugs and biological molecules.

  • Better mechanical strengths of the material used.

To determine cyto-compatibly, 15 percent of the studies conducted indicate usage of human tissue. Different studies showed different outcome measures making conclusions and comparisons challenging.
-end-
For more information on the study, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/159449

Bentham Science Publishers

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