Different forms of sugar impact hunger-suppressing hormones in young adults

December 10, 2020

WASHINGTON--Drinks with sucrose compared to glucose may cause young adults to produce lower levels of appetite-regulating hormones, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Too much sugar consumption is a contributing factor for obesity. Sucrose, or "table sugar," is composed of equal parts glucose and fructose and is often added to processed foods like soda, candy, cereal and canned foods. Glucose can be found in foods like honey and dried fruits.

"Our study found that when young adults consumed drinks containing sucrose, they produced lower levels of appetite-regulating hormones than when they consumed drinks containing glucose (the main type of sugar that circulates in the bloodstream)," said study author Kathleen Page, M.D., of the USC Keck School of Medicine in Los Angeles, Calif. "This study is the first to show how individual characteristics, including body weight, sex and insulin sensitivity, affect hormone responses to two different types of sugar, sucrose and glucose. These findings highlight the need to consider how individual characteristics affect the body's responses to different types of sugar and other nutrients in our food supply."

The researchers studied 69 young adults between the ages of 18-35 years old who participated in two study visits where they consumed drinks containing either sucrose or glucose. They found that when the young adults consumed drinks containing sucrose, they produced lower amounts of hormones that suppress hunger compared to when they consumed drinks containing an equal dose of glucose. They also found that individual characteristics, including body weight and sex, affected the hormone responses to the different sugars.
-end-
Other authors of the study include: Alexandra G. Yunker, Sabrina Jones, Brendan Angelo, Alexis DeFendis and Trevor A. Pickering of the USC Keck School of Medicine; Shan Luo, Hilary M. Dorton and Jasmin M. Alves of the USC Keck School of Medicine and the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, Calif.; and John R. Monterosso of the University of Southern California.

The manuscript received funding from the National Institute of Diabetes and

Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

The manuscript, "Appetite Regulating Hormones are Reduced After Oral Sucrose vs Glucose: Influence of Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Sex." was published online, ahead of print.

Endocrinologists are at the core of solving the most pressing health problems of our time, from diabetes and obesity to infertility, bone health, and hormone-related cancers. The Endocrine Society is the world's oldest and largest organization of scientists devoted to hormone research and physicians who care for people with hormone-related conditions.

The Society has more than 18,000 members, including scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in 122 countries. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www.endocrine.org. Follow us on Twitter at @TheEndoSociety and @EndoMedia.

The Endocrine Society

Related Glucose Articles from Brightsurf:

Cannabinoids decrease the metabolism of glucose in the brain
What happens when THC acts on the glial cells named astrocytes ?

What drives inflammation in type 2 diabetes? Not glucose, says new research
Research led by Barbara Nikolajczyk, Ph.D., disproved the conventional wisdom that glucose was the primary driver of chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes.

ALS patients may benefit from more glucose
A new study led by scientists at the UA has uncovered a potential new way to treat patients with ALS, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease.

Artificial muscles powered by glucose
Artificial muscles made from polymers can now be powered by energy from glucose and oxygen, just like biological muscles.

Efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels from glucose
Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production.

Protein released from fat after exercise improves glucose
Exercise training causes dramatic changes to fat. Additionally, this 'trained' fat releases beneficial factors into the bloodstream.

WSU researchers create 3D-printed glucose biosensors
A 3D-printed glucose biosensor for use in wearable monitors has been created by Washington State University researchers.

Gut protein mutations shield against spikes in glucose
Why is it that, despite consuming the same number of calories, sodium and sugar, some people face little risk of diabetes or obesity while others are at higher risk?

Glucose binding molecule could transform the treatment of diabetes
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new synthetic glucose binding molecule platform that brings us one step closer to the development of the world's first glucose-responsive insulin which, say researchers, will transform the treatment of diabetes.

Nutrients may reduce blood glucose levels
One amino acid, alanine, may produce a short-term lowering of glucose levels by altering energy metabolism in the cell.

Read More: Glucose News and Glucose Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.