Trained dogs might be able to detect people infected with COVID-19 by sniffing their sweat

December 10, 2020

Trained dogs might be able to detect people infected with COVID-19 by sniffing their sweat, according to a preliminary proof-of-concept study.
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Article Title: "Can the detection dog alert on COVID-19 positive persons by sniffing axillary sweat samples? A proof-of-concept study"

Funding: DiagNose, Cynopro Detection Dogs volunteered their dogs to participate to the study without any financial request. DiagNose, Cynopro Detection Dogs provided support in the form of salaries for authors [PM, MBF, AC, SR, KB], but did not have any additional role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Additionally, ICTS Europe, Biodesiv SAS, and Mario K9 also provided support in the form of salaries for authors [PM, GH, MI], but did not have any additional role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. The specific roles of these authors are articulated in the 'author contributions' section.

Competing Interests: DiagNose, Cynopro Detection Dogs, ICTS Europe, Biodesiv SAS, and Mario K9 provided support in the form of salaries for authors. This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. There are no patents, products in development or marketed products associated with this research to declare.

Article URL: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243122

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