Mental distress due to abortion lasts for years

December 11, 2005

Women who have had an abortion still experience mental distress related to the abortion years after it happened. A study published today in the open access journal BMC Medicine reveals that five years on, women who have had an abortion suffer higher levels of mental distress than other women and than women who have had a miscarriage.

Anne Nordal Broen and colleagues from the University of Oslo, in Norway, collaborated with colleagues from the Buskerud Hospital in Drammen, Norway. They studied 40 women who had had a miscarriage and 80 women who had undergone an induced abortion. The women were interviewed and asked to complete questionnaires 10 days, six months, two years and five years after the pregnancy termination. The aim was to assess the women's feelings about the event and measure their levels of stress, anxiety and their quality of life.

Broen et al.'s results show that women who had a miscarriage suffer more mental distress up until six months after the event than women who had an abortion. Women who had an abortion, however, experienced more mental distress long after the event - two and five years afterwards - than women who had a miscarriage. Women who had an abortion experienced high levels of anxiety, feelings of guilt, shame and relief and had to make efforts to avoid thoughts about the event. When compared with women from the general population, women who had an abortion experienced more anxiety 10 days, six months, two years and five years after the event.
-end-
Article:
The course of mental health after miscarriage and induced abortion: a five-year follow-up study.
Anne Nordal Broen MD, Torbjorn Moum Professor, Anne Sejersted Bodtker MD and
Oivind Ekeberg MD, Professor
BMC Medicine 2005, 3:18 (12 December 2005)

BioMed Central

Related Miscarriage Articles from Brightsurf:

Post-traumatic stress experienced by partners following miscarriage
One in 12 partners experience post-traumatic stress after miscarriage, suggests a new study.

Miscarriage risk increases each week alcohol is used in early pregnancy
Each week a woman consumes alcohol during the first five to 10 weeks of pregnancy is associated with an incremental 8% increase in risk of miscarriage, according to a study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers.

Mild thyroid dysfunction affects one in five women with a history of miscarriage or subfertility
Mild thyroid abnormalities affect up to one in five women with a history of miscarriage or subfertility which is a prolonged time span of trying to become pregnant, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy may trigger long-term post-traumatic stress
One in six women experience long-term post-traumatic stress following miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

Recurrent miscarriage: Diabetes drug could lead to new treatment
A drug designed to tackle diabetes could also be repurposed as the first treatment to prevent miscarriage by targeting the lining of the womb itself, according to a clinical trial led by the University of Warwick.

BU study finds celebrity disclosures increase discussion of miscarriage on twitter
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study characterizes how Twitter users discuss miscarriage and preterm birth.

Certain steps help lead to healthy pregnancies in women with rheumatoid arthritis
For women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), taking certain steps to ensure that they have a healthy pregnancy leads to a reduced risk of complicated birth or miscarriage, according to a study in Arthritis Care & Research.

Progesterone from an unexpected source may affect miscarriage risk
Progesterone signaling is key to a healthy pregnancy. An Austrian team's research suggests a link between recurrent miscarriage and disrupted progesterone synthesis.

Finding support outside the clinic -- the intersection of instagram and miscarriage
An interdisciplinary team of researchers explore how women use the platform to talk openly about the emotional distress of a miscarriage and how social media can inform patient care.

Is disability a risk factor for miscarriage?
A new study compared the proportion of women with any cognitive, physical, or independent living disability who experienced a miscarriage during the previous 5-year period to women without disabilities.

Read More: Miscarriage News and Miscarriage Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.