Invitrogen features new scientific online resources at ASCB Meeting

December 11, 2006

San Diego, Calif., December 11, 2006 - Invitrogen Corporation (Nasdaq:IVGN), a leader in life science research, today introduced the newest member of its free online scientific resource collection, iGene, a platform that allows researchers to conveniently search for experimental reagents by gene or protein. This announcement as well as the launch of the Premo™ cameleon calcium sensor, which uses fluorescent protein color emission to detect calcium levels in live cells for cell signaling studies, were made during the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) 2006 Annual Meeting this week.

Invitrogen developed its suite of online bioinformatics solutions - including the iProtocol™ Online Library, the iPath™ Online Bioatlas, and the iGene gene or protein search engine resource - to simplify the transition from experimental planning to selecting optimal research products. By integrating all known human, mouse and rat genes and proteins into one database, the iGene search engine helps scientists quickly filter through more than 250,000 products related to their gene or protein of interest. Researchers can search using several criteria including keyword, gene accession number, gene symbol, or batch search to find all of the antibody, assay, protein, cloning, qPCR or RNAi products available for their specific experimental needs. Search results also link to external resources at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and to relevant signaling and metabolic pathway maps on the iPath™ Online Bioatlas. To explore this resource, visit www.invitrogen.com/iGene.

"As the leading provider of integrated research solutions, Invitrogen's goal is to drive standardization of technologies and methods by making available to scientists worldwide a series of top-quality, application-based bioinformatics tools completely free of charge," said Michael Stapleton, Vice President of Marketing/eBusiness at Invitrogen. "Invitrogen's rapidly expanding online scientific efforts are at the forefront of the internet revolution, taking advantage of the most effective medium for promoting best practices in research."

Invitrogen also announced the launch of its Premo™ cameleon calcium sensor, which will provide advantages in imaging applications as well as in compound screening employing HTS methodologies. Premo™ cameleon is a genetically-encoded fluorescent protein-based sensor for cellular calcium signal measurements. It provides a ratiometric read-out at visual excitation wavelengths in the presence of calcium and interferes minimally with cell physiology. Conveniently pre-packaged in the biosafe and nontoxic BacMam insect virus delivery format, Premo™ cameleon is designed for live-cell application to a broad range of mammalian cells, including neuronal, primary and stem cells.

Other Invitrogen ASCB activities include:
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For more information, visit Invitrogen at booth #422 during ASCB being held at the San Diego Convention Center December 9-13, 2006.

About Invitrogen

Invitrogen Corporation (Nasdaq:IVGN) provides products and services that support academic and government research institutions and pharmaceutical and biotech companies worldwide in their efforts to improve the human condition. The company provides essential life science technologies for disease research, drug discovery, and commercial bioproduction. Invitrogen's own research and development efforts are focused on breakthrough innovation in all major areas of biological discovery including functional genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics and cell biology -- placing Invitrogen's products in nearly every major laboratory in the world. Founded in 1987, Invitrogen is headquartered in Carlsbad, California, and conducts business in more than 70 countries around the world. The company globally employs approximately 4,800 professionals and had revenues of more than $1.2 billion in 2005. For more information, visit www.invitrogen.com.

Safe Harbor Statement

Certain statements contained in this press release are considered "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, and it is Invitrogen's intent that such statements be protected by the safe harbor created thereby. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those regarding: 1) iGene to allow researchers to conveniently search for experimental reagents by gene or protein; 2) Premo™ cameleon calcium sensor's ability to use fluorescent protein color emission to detect calcium levels in live cells for cell signaling studies; 3) the ability of iGene to simplify the transition from experimental planning to selecting optimal research products; Such forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from future results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Potential risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the risks: a) of any inability to timely create or acquire new products with the desired characteristics; and b) of the unpredictability of future demand for current or future products; as well as other risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in Invitrogen's Securities and Exchange Commission filings.

Media Contacts
Invitrogen Corporation:
Eric Endicott (760) 268-7438, eric.endicott@invitrogen.com

Porter Novelli, Life Sciences

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