Journal Maturitas publishes position statement on diet and health in midlife and beyond

December 11, 2012

Amsterdam, December 11, 2012 - Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announced today the publication of a position statement by the European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS) in journal Maturitas.

As we live longer, ensuring a healthy diet becomes a growing public health issue. There is increasing evidence that life-style factors, such as nutrition, physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption have a profound modifying effect on the epidemiology of most major chronic conditions affecting midlife health. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is best prevented or managed by restricting the total amount of carbohydrate in the diet and by deriving carbohydrate energy from whole-grain cereals, fruits and vegetables. Obese elderly people should therefore be encouraged to lose weight. The substitution of saturated and trans-fatty acids by mono-unsaturated and omega-3 fatty acids found in olive oil and oily fish are important dietary interventions for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Adequate protein, calcium and vitamin D intake should be ensured for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures. A diet rich in vitamin E, folate, B12 and omega-3 fatty acids may be protective against cognitive decline.
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The EMAS position statement: 'Diet and health in midlife and beyond', by Irene Lambrinoudaki, Iuliana Ceausu, Herman Depypere, Tamer Erel, Margaret Rees, Karin Schenck-Gustafsson, Tommaso Simoncini, Florence Tremollieres, Yvonne van der Schouw, Faustino R. Pérez-López. (10.1016/j.maturitas.2012.10.019) and other papers discussing health in midlife appear in Maturitas Volume 74, Issue 1 (January 2013), published by Elsevier is now available on ScienceDirect.

Notes to editors

The EMAS position statement and other papers published in the same issue are available to credentialed journalists upon request; contact Greyling Peoples at +31 20 485 3323. g.peoples@elsevier.com

About European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS)

EMAS promotes the study of midlife health through its journal, congresses, schools and website and encourages the exchange of research and professional experience between members.

Using a range of activities and through its affiliates, EMAS aims to guarantee and provide the same standard of education and information throughout Europe on midlife health in both genders. Recognizing the issues arising from increased longevity the society also provides articles, patient information, web resources, and referrals for healthcare providers in the field and keeps its members up-to-date. For more information go to: http://www.emas-online.org/

About Maturitas

Maturitas is an international multidisciplinary peer reviewed scientific journal of midlife health and beyond, publishing original research, reviews, consensus statements and guidelines. The scope encompasses all aspects of postreproductive health in both genders ranging from basic science to health and social care.ABOUT ELSEVIER

Elsevier is a world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier's online solutions include SciVerse ScienceDirect, SciVerse Scopus, Reaxys, MD Consult and Nursing Consult, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite and MEDai's Pinpoint Review, which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world-leading publisher and information provider, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).Media contact

Greyling Peoples
Elsevier
+31 20 485 3323
g.peoples@elsevier.com

Elsevier

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