NYU-Poly professor named a fellow of the ACM

December 11, 2012

NEW YORK, December 11, 2012 - Keith Ross, the Leonard J. Shustek Chair in Computer Science at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University (NYU-Poly) and the head of NYU-Poly's Computer Science and Engineering Department, has been chosen as a fellow of the Association for Computer Machining (ACM) in recognition of his contributions to the design and modeling of computer networks and Internet applications.

The ACM is the world's largest professional society for computer science and elevates no more than one percent of its members to fellows.

Ross has done seminal research in the areas of computer networking and P2P (peer-to-peer) systems, and he has also been widely lauded for his work in Internet measurement, security and privacy, content distribution networks and Markov decision processes.

"Professor Ross is an exceptional scholar and a steady anchor for a thriving department," said NYU-Poly Acting President and Provost Katepalli R. Sreenivasan. "We take great pride in his affiliation with NYU-Poly and the pioneering work he has done here to make our institution an important center of computer networking. The ACM has accorded him a richly deserved honor."

Ross is also a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and recipient of numerous prestigious best paper awards. He has served as an advisor to the Federal Trade Commission on P2P file sharing and is co-author (with James F. Kurose) the most popular textbook on computer networks, Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet.

Ross founded Wimba, an Internet technology firm that develops and markets Java-based asynchronous and synchronous voice-over-IP technologies, primarily for the online education and language-learning markets. Wimba was recently acquired by Blackboard.

Ross holds a bachelor of science in electrical engineering from Tufts University, a master of engineering in electrical engineering from Columbia University and a doctorate in computer and control engineering from the University of Michigan.

The ACM unites computing educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field's challenges. Its Fellows Program recognizes outstanding members for achievements in computer science and information technology and for significant contributions to the mission of the ACM.

"It is an enormous privilege to be named an ACM Fellow," Ross said. "I would like to thank everyone with whom I have worked over the years, especially my Ph.D. students, collaborators and colleagues at NYU-Poly."

ACM will formally recognize the 2012 Fellows at its annual Awards Banquet on June 15, 2013, in San Francisco. Additional information about the ACM 2012 Fellows, the awards event, as well as previous ACM Fellows and award winners is available at www.acm.org/awards.
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About Polytechnic Institute of New York University

Polytechnic Institute of New York University (formerly Polytechnic University), an affiliated institute of New York University, is a comprehensive school of engineering, applied sciences, technology and research, and is rooted in a 158-year tradition of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship: i2e. The institution, founded in 1854, is the nation's second-oldest private engineering school. In addition to its main campus in New York City at MetroTech Center in downtown Brooklyn, it also offers programs at sites throughout the region, around the globe and remotely through NYUe-Poly. NYU-Poly is an integral part of NYU Abu Dhabi, NYU Shanghai and the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP) in downtown Brooklyn. For more information, visit www.poly.edu.

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