TAMEST announces recipients of the 2013 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Awards

December 11, 2012

AUSTIN, Texas--The Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas (TAMEST) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2013 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Awards who will be honored during a banquet on Thursday, January 17, 2013, in conjunction with TAMEST's 10th Annual Conference at the Westin Galleria Hotel in Dallas.

The Edith and Peter O'Donnell Awards recognize rising Texas researchers who are addressing the essential role that science and technology play in society, and whose work meets the highest standards of exemplary professional performance, creativity, and resourcefulness. The 2013 awards recipients are: "Texas continues to be a major center of scientific achievement for young scientists as demonstrated by the 2013 O'Donnell Awards recipients," said Dr. William Brinkley, TAMEST's 2012 President. "These gifted researchers are changing the world in areas as diverse as the human immune system, nanoscale clean energy technologies, molecular physiology, and oil spill response technologies, ensuring our state's position as a global leader in scientific discovery and technological innovation."
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The O'Donnell Awards were first presented in 2006, with a total of $725,000 awarded to 32 recipients since the inception of the program. The awards are named in honor of Edith and Peter O'Donnell who are among the state's staunchest advocates for excellence in scientific advancement and STEM education.

TAMEST's 10th Annual Conference--Probing the Depths: under the Sea and into the Brain--will be held on January 17-18, 2013, and will feature a program on the latest research developments in neuroscience and deepwater exploration.

The 2013 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Awards video trailer can be viewed online at http://www.tamest.org/programs/2013-recipients.html.

For further information about the TAMEST 2013 Annual Conference, please visit http://www.tamest.org/events/annual.html.

About TAMEST The Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas (TAMEST) was founded in 2004 to provide broader recognition of the state's top achievers in medicine, engineering, and science, and to build a stronger identity for Texas as an important destination and center of achievement in these fields. Members include Texas' 10 Nobel laureates and the 250+ National Academies members. TAMEST brings the state's top scientific, academic, and corporate minds together to further position Texas as a national research leader. TAMEST also hopes to foster the next generation of scientists and to increase the awareness and communication among the state's best and brightest about research priorities for the future.

University of Texas at Austin

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