CNIO study chosen as discovery of the year in regenerative medicine

December 11, 2013

The prestigious journal Nature Medicine has taken a look at the year and chosen one of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre's (CNIO) studies as the most important in the stem cell category for its special December edition. The edition highlights eight categories, including, as well as stem cells, immunology, cardiovascular disease or neuroscience.

The study in question, led by Manuel Serrano, the director of CNIO's Molecular Oncology Programme, was published last September in the journal Nature with the title Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPSCs with totipotency features (https://www.cnio.es/es/news/docs/manuel-serrano-nature-11sep13-es.pdf).

The most important milestone achieved by the research was demostrating that cells from a variety of tissues, such as that of intestine, stomach, kidney or pancreas, can be turned into embryonic stem cells. To do so, CNIO researchers used the technique developed by the scientist Shinya Yamanaka (2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine) to obtain embryonic stem cells in vitro.

"Being able to apply this technique directly to tissues from living organisms was a big surprise, as it was thought in vivo conditions would not allow for this extent of cellular plasticity", says Serrano.

The journal Nature Medicine highlights that: "The significance of this work goes beyond the generation of a mouse with reprogrammable tissue", adding that "stem cells created in vivo reached a totipotent-like state and a plasticity that surpasses that of embryonic stem cells and other iPSCs made in a dish".

In this context, the cells obtained in Serrano's laboratory were even capable of forming pseudo-embryonic structures and extra-embryonic tissues such as the yolk sac.

The researchers emphasise that practical applications might yet be some way off, but admit it could change the direction of stem cell research and its applications for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

"The in vivo reprogramming achieved this year may bring researchers one step closer to protocols that can accomplish controlled tissue reprogramming", says the journal in its conclusion on CNIO's work.
-end-
Video expalining the research:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9R9DAGNEnw

Reference articles:

Notable advances 2013. Nature Medicine (2013). DOI: 10.1038/nm1213-1564

Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPSCs with totipotency features. María Abad, Lluc Mosteiro, Cristina Pantoja, Marta Cañamero, Teresa Rayón, Inmaculada Ors, Osvaldo Graña, Diego Megías, Orlando Domínguez, Dolores Martínez, Miguel Manzanares, Sagrario Ortega, Manuel Serrano. NATURE (2013). DOI: 10.1038/nature12586

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas (CNIO)

Related Stem Cells Articles from Brightsurf:

SUTD researchers create heart cells from stem cells using 3D printing
SUTD researchers 3D printed a micro-scaled physical device to demonstrate a new level of control in the directed differentiation of stem cells, enhancing the production of cardiomyocytes.

More selective elimination of leukemia stem cells and blood stem cells
Hematopoietic stem cells from a healthy donor can help patients suffering from acute leukemia.

Computer simulations visualize how DNA is recognized to convert cells into stem cells
Researchers of the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW - The Netherlands) and the Max Planck Institute in Münster (Germany) have revealed how an essential protein helps to activate genomic DNA during the conversion of regular adult human cells into stem cells.

First events in stem cells becoming specialized cells needed for organ development
Cell biologists at the University of Toronto shed light on the very first step stem cells go through to turn into the specialized cells that make up organs.

Surprising research result: All immature cells can develop into stem cells
New sensational study conducted at the University of Copenhagen disproves traditional knowledge of stem cell development.

The development of brain stem cells into new nerve cells and why this can lead to cancer
Stem cells are true Jacks-of-all-trades of our bodies, as they can turn into the many different cell types of all organs.

Healthy blood stem cells have as many DNA mutations as leukemic cells
Researchers from the Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology have shown that the number of mutations in healthy and leukemic blood stem cells does not differ.

New method grows brain cells from stem cells quickly and efficiently
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a faster method to generate functional brain cells, called astrocytes, from embryonic stem cells.

NUS researchers confine mature cells to turn them into stem cells
Recent research led by Professor G.V. Shivashankar of the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore and the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology in Italy, has revealed that mature cells can be reprogrammed into re-deployable stem cells without direct genetic modification -- by confining them to a defined geometric space for an extended period of time.

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have for the first time succeeded in converting human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells by activating the cell's own genes.

Read More: Stem Cells News and Stem Cells Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.