UT Southwestern scientist honored as rising star in Texas research

December 11, 2013

DALLAS - Dec. 11, 2013 - The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST) selected Dr. Richard Bruick, Associate Professor of Biochemistry at UT Southwestern Medical Center, as one of four recipients of the 2014 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Awards, which recognize rising Texas researchers.

Dr. Bruick, who studies factors that affect the critical iron and oxygen balance in cells, will be honored Jan. 16 during TAMEST's 11th annual conference near Austin.

TAMEST presents four Edith and Peter O'Donnell Awards each year - in medicine, science, engineering, and technological innovation - to recognize Texas researchers whose work exemplifies excellence in advancing understanding of important unmet needs. Each award consists of a $25,000 honorarium, a citation, a trophy, and an invitation to speak at the conference.

"The O'Donnell awards highlight some of the most promising research being carried out in Texas today," said Dr. Daniel K. Podolsky, President of UT Southwestern. "In defining some of the most critical determinants regulating basic cell function, Dr. Bruick's discoveries can serve as a foundation for development of new therapeutic paradigms with potential impact in a range of disorders."

Dr. Bruick, honored in the medicine field, researches cellular responses to maintain oxygen and iron homeostasis that have helped lay the foundation for the development of small molecule therapeutics. These hold the potential to provide improved treatments for anemia, renal cancers, and iron overload disorders.

"I am deeply honored to receive this award, which reflects the efforts of many talented lab members and colleagues. I'm incredibly grateful for the support my work has received at UT Southwestern, starting with my postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Biochemistry Chair Dr. Steven McKnight," said Dr. Bruick, a Michael L. Rosenberg Scholar in Biomedical Research at UT Southwestern. "Our studies have greatly benefited from the vision of UT Southwestern leadership who created resources such as the High Throughput Screening (HTS) facility, providing us with opportunities to move our basic science discoveries toward clinical applications."

Dr. Bruick said the HTS facility, which makes it possible to sort through hundreds of thousands of chemicals for those with favorable attributes, is just one of several shared facilities across campus that allow researchers access to advanced technology that would be prohibitively expensive for any one researcher, particularly for early-career investigators.

The awards, first presented in 2006, are named in honor of the O'Donnells, who are among the state's staunchest advocates for excellence in scientific advancement and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education.
-end-
About UT Southwestern Medical Center
UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty has many distinguished members, including five who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 90,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 1.9 million outpatient visits a year.

This news release is available on our home page at utsouthwestern.edu/home/news/index.html

To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via email, subscribe at utsouthwestern.edu/receivenews

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Related Engineering Articles from Brightsurf:

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity

Next frontier in bacterial engineering
A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering.

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.

Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.

Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching.

New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.

Engineering for high-speed devices
A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers.

Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.

Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.

Read More: Engineering News and Engineering Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.