New diamond harder than ring bling

December 11, 2016

The Australian National University (ANU) has led an international project to make a diamond that's predicted to be harder than a jeweller's diamond and useful for cutting through ultra-solid materials on mining sites.

ANU Associate Professor Jodie Bradby said her team - including ANU PhD student Thomas Shiell and experts from RMIT, the University of Sydney and the United States - made nano-sized Lonsdaleite, which is a hexagonal diamond only found in nature at the site of meteorite impacts such as Canyon Diablo in the US.

"This new diamond is not going to be on any engagement rings. You'll more likely find it on a mining site - but I still think that diamonds are a scientist's best friend. Any time you need a super-hard material to cut something, this new diamond has the potential to do it more easily and more quickly," said Dr Bradby from the ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering.

Her research team made the Lonsdaleite in a diamond anvil at 400 degrees Celsius, halving the temperature at which it can be formed in a laboratory.

"The hexagonal structure of this diamond's atoms makes it much harder than regular diamonds, which have a cubic structure. We've been able to make it at the nanoscale and this is exciting because often with these materials 'smaller is stronger'."

Lonsdaleite is named after the famous British pioneering female crystallographer Dame Kathleen Lonsdale, who was the first woman elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society.

The research is published in Scientific Reports.

Co-researcher Professor Dougal McCulloch from RMIT said the collaboration of world-leading experts in the field was essential to the project's success.

"The discovery of the nano-crystalline hexagonal diamond was only made possible by close collaborative ties between leading physicists from Australia and overseas, and the team utilised state-of-the-art instrumentation such as electron microscopes," he said.

Corresponding author from the University of Sydney, Professor David McKenzie, said he was doing the night shift in the United States laboratory as part of the research when he noticed a little shoulder on the side of a peak.

"And it didn't mean all that much until we examined it later on in Melbourne and in Canberra - and we realised that it was something very, very different."
-end-
Images related to the research are available via this Dropbox link.

You can also watch the video interview with the researchers on the ANU YouTube channel.

FOR INTERVIEW:

Associate Professor Jodie Bradby
ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering
T: +61 2 6125 4916
M: +61 40 227 6767
E: jodie.bradby@anu.edu.au

Professor Dougal McCulloch
Director, RMIT Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility
T: +61 3 9925 3391
E: dougal.mcculloch@rmit.edu.au

Professor David McKenzie
The Applied and Plasma Physics research group, University of Sydney
T: +61 2 9351 5986
M: +61 413 385 850
E: david.mckenzie@sydney.edu.au

FOR MEDIA ASSISTANCE:

Will Wright
ANU media team
T: +61 2 6125 7979
M: +61 478 337 740
E: media@anu.edu.au

David Glanz
RMIT Senior Manager, Marketing and Communications
T: +61 3 9925 2807
M: +61 438 547 723
E: david.glanz@rmit.edu.au

Vivienne Reiner
University of Sydney media team
T: +61 2 9351 2390
M: +61 438 021 390
E: vivienne.reiner@sydney.edu.au

Australian National University

Related Diamond Articles from Brightsurf:

Getting single-crystal diamond ready for electronics
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners polished single-crystal diamond to near-atomic smoothness without damaging it.

Turning diamond into metal
Researchers have discovered a way to tweak tiny needles of diamond in a controlled way to transform their electronic properties, dialing them from insulating, through semiconducting, all the way to highly conductive, or metallic.

Building a harder diamond
Scientists at the University of Tsukuba create a theoretical carbon-based material that would be even harder than diamond.

Quantum diamond sensing
Researchers from the University of Maryland and colleagues report a new quantum sensing technique that allows high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on small molecules in dilute solution in a 10 picoliter sample volume -- roughly equivalent to a single cell.

Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar
Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on the Madagascar frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete.

The IKBFU scientists created the first diamond x-ray micro lens
A diamond is a unique and expensive material. But it is almost indestructible which makes the lens made of it more economically profitable than metallic or polymeric ones in the long run.

Stanford research maps a faster, easier way to build diamond
With the right amount of pressure and surprisingly little heat, a substance found in fossil fuels can transform into pure diamond.

Bending diamond at the nanoscale
A team of Australian scientists has discovered diamond can be bent and deformed, at the nanoscale at least.

A tech jewel: Converting graphene into diamond film
Can two layers of the ''king of the wonder materials,'' i.e. graphene, be linked and converted to the thinnest diamond-like material, the ''king of the crystals''?

Researchers teleport information within a diamond
Researchers from the Yokohama National University have teleported quantum information securely within the confines of a diamond.

Read More: Diamond News and Diamond Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.