Paternal grandfather's high access to food may indicate higher mortality risk in grandsons

December 11, 2018

A paternal grandfather's access to food during his childhood is associated with mortality risk, especially cancer mortality, in his grandson, shows a large three-generational study from Stockholm University. The reason might be epigenetic - that environmental exposures in one generation may influence health outcomes in following generations.

If a paternal grandfather had good access to food and experienced unusually high yields as a young boy, his grandson - but not granddaughter - has a higher mortality risk, the study shows. Especially high was the risk of cancer mortality. The researchers traced approximately 9,000 grandparents and examined the mortality of their grandchildren, more than 11,000 individuals. "Paternal grandfather's access to food predicts all-cause and cancer mortality in grandsons" is published in the journal Nature Communications.

- The results are very clear when it comes to the correlation between a grandfather's access to food and his grandson's mortality. A previous Swedish smaller study, the Overkalix study, showed the same result. However, we have been unable to determine other correlations over the generations, says Denny Vågerö, one of the authors of the paper and professor at the Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm University.

Previous research has suggested that the pre-pubertal, slow growth period (ages 9-12) is particularly vulnerable to nutritional effects. Denny Vågerö and colleagues' new study confirms this is true when it comes to men. However, there is no difference in mortality risk between grandsons who's paternal grandfather had low or average access to food.

Accounting for social factors, such as education, family size and income, the correlation between access to food and mortality in grandsons was enhanced.

The researchers do not claim to explain the causal relationship but believe that epigenetics might be the key.

- Introduction of chemical pesticides was limited in the end of the 1800's and it's not likely that it would have led to new, large-scale mutations. Therefore, the most reasonable explanation would be that boys', but not girls', germ line cells are open for epigenetic change such as nutritional effects, during pre-puberty.

- If that is the case, these changes might be passed on to following generations, something that is also shown in animal experiments. However, more research is needed, both in epidemiology and molecular biology, emphasises Denny Vågerö.
-end-
About the study

The study "Paternal grandfather's access to food predicts all-cause and cancer mortality in grandsons" expands on Uppsala Birth Cohort MultigenerationStudy. Grandparents (9,039) have been traced and regional data on the yields of harvests have been used to determine the grandparents' access to food during their childhood, 1874-1910. These results were followed up by data on mortality from 1961-2015 for their grandchildren (11,561).

The study has been published in Nature Communications on December 11, 2018.

Authors of the study:

Denny Vågerö and Vanda Aronsson, Stockholm University, and Gerard van der Berg (University of Bristol) and Pia Pinger (University of Bonn)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-07617-9

For further information

Denny Vågerö, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm University (Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden)
Tel: +46706809899
E-mail: denny.vagero@su.se

Stockholm University

Related Mortality Articles from Brightsurf:

Being in treatment with statins reduces COVID-19 mortality by 22% to 25%
A research by the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV) and Pere Virgili Institut (IISPV) led by LluĂ­s Masana has found that people who are being treated with statins have a 22% to 25% lower risk of dying from COVID-19.

Mortality rate higher for US rural residents
A recent study by Syracuse University sociology professor Shannon Monnat shows that mortality rates are higher for U.S. working-age residents who live in rural areas instead of metro areas, and the gap is getting wider.

COVID-19, excess all-cause mortality in US, 18 comparison countries
COVID-19 deaths and excess all-cause mortality in the U.S. are compared with 18 countries with diverse COVID-19 responses in this study.

New analysis shows hydroxychloroquine does not lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and is associated with increased mortality when combined with the antibiotic azithromycin
A new meta-analysis of published studies into the drug hydroxychloroquine shows that it does not lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and using it combined with the antibiotic azithromycin is associated with a 27% increased mortality.

Hydroxychloroquine reduces in-hospital COVID-19 mortality
An Italian observational study contributes to the ongoing debate regarding the use of hydroxychloroquine in the current pandemic.

What's the best way to estimate and track COVID-19 mortality?
When used correctly, the symptomatic case fatality ratio (sCFR) and the infection fatality ratio (IFR) are better measures by which to monitor COVID-19 epidemics than the commonly reported case fatality ratio (CFR), according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Anthony Hauser of the University of Bern, Switzerland, and colleagues.

COVID-19: Bacteriophage could decrease mortality
Bacteriophage can reduce bacterial growth in the lungs, limiting fluid build-up.

COPD and smoking associated with higher COVID-19 mortality
Current smokers and people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an increased risk of severe complications and higher mortality with COVID-19 infection, according to a new study published May 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jaber Alqahtani of University College London, UK, and colleagues.

Highest mortality risks for poor and unemployed
Large dataset shows that income, work status and education have a clear influence on mortality in Germany.

Addressing causes of mortality in Zambia
Despite the fact that people in sub-Saharan Africa are now living longer than they did two decades ago, their average life expectancy remains below that of the rest of the world population.

Read More: Mortality News and Mortality Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.