Nav: Home

Predicting growth hormone treatment success

December 12, 2007

Growth hormone treatments work better on some children than on others, but judging which candidates will gain those vital inches in height is no simple task. Now researchers have developed a new mathematical model which predicts the optimal dose of growth hormone to treat children who are abnormally short for a wide range of reasons. A study published in the online open access journal BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making describes a model that can be more widely applied than previous versions, with greater predictive accuracy.

Jovanna Dahlgren and colleagues at Gothenburg University in Sweden analysed data from 415 short prepubertal children who had undergone GH treatment to develop a model that predicts an individual's response. The team gathered data including the children's length and weight at birth, height before and during treatment and their parents' height. The model was then validated by applying it to a group of 112 different children. The model's accuracy was substantially improved by including data on blood levels of growth hormone and other growth-related hormones, such as insulin-like growth factors and leptin.

Dr Dahlgren states, "The models presented serve as a practical clinical tool for selecting children for successful growth hormone treatment ... and provide the highest prediction accuracy available."

Growth hormone treatments are expensive, involve daily injections, and are associated with the risk of overdose. To assess whether growth hormone treatment would be appropriate for a particular child, an accurate prediction of how much growth would result from the treatment is crucial. This new research will help clinicians determine the children most likely to benefit from treatment, and the most appropriate dose.
-end-
1. Models predicting the growth response to growth hormone treatment in short children independent of GH status, birth size and gestational age
Jovanna Dahlgren, Berit Kristrom, Aimon Niklasson, Andreas FM Nierop, Sten Rosberg, Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2007, 7:40 (12 December 2007)

To view the article please visit the journal website: http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmedinformdecismak/

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's open access policy.

2. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research articles in information management, systems and technology in healthcare and the study of medical decision making. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making (ISSN 1472-6947) is indexed/tracked/covered by PubMed, MEDLINE, CAS, Scopus, EMBASE, Thomson Scientific (ISI) and Google Scholar.

3. BioMed Central is an independent online publishing house committed to providing immediate access without charge to the peer-reviewed biological and medical research it publishes. This commitment is based on the view that open access to research is essential to the rapid and efficient communication of science.

BioMed Central

Related Growth Hormone Articles:

FASEB Science Research Conference: Growth Hormone/Prolactin
This SRC will bring together international scientists from academia and industry for lively discussions on the latest developments in the growth hormone (GH)/prolactin (PRL) family of hormones and their clinical applications.
Low thyroid hormone before birth alters growth and development of fetal pancreas
Levels of thyroid hormone in babies influences insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas, according to a new study published in The Journal of Physiology.
When should doctors treat short children and teens with growth hormone?
When is it appropriate to treat short children with growth hormone?
Still no strong evidence that adjunctive treatment with human growth hormone in IVF improves results
Despite its occasional use as an adjunct in IVF, human growth hormone appears of little benefit to women having difficulty conceiving.
Aromatase inhibitors plus growth hormone may help short adolescent boys grow taller
Aromatase inhibitors, when used for up to three years in combination with growth hormone, may effectively and safely help very short adolescent boys grow taller, new research suggests.
More Growth Hormone News and Growth Hormone Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...