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Fuel Cells Science and Technology in September 2008

December 12, 2007

Oxford, UK, 12 December 2007 - Elsevier, the world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services is pleased to announce that it will hold the Fuel Cells Science & Technology 2008 event on 8-9 October 2008. Following the success of the previous three events, the fourth event in the series will be held at the Confederation of Danish Industries, Copenhagen, Denmark.

International delegates to this two-day conference will have the opportunity to find out about the latest advances in fuel cell systems and meet with engineers and researchers from across the globe.

With the recent appearance of the new Honda FCX Clarity on the popular UK BBC show TopGear and BMW manufacturing one hundred hydrogen powered 7-Series cars, it is evident that fuel cells are emerging onto the consumer market. The popularity of alternative, greener cars is certainly apparent in California too, where governor Arnold Schwarzenegger is planning to build a string of hydrogen filling stations along the Pacific coast of the US, dubbed 'hydrogen highway'. To discuss the most recent issues in fuel cell systems and find out about the latest advances in cell and stack technology, join international experts at the Fuel Cells Science & Technology 2008 event, taking place in Copenhagen.
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To be part of this conference, or to submit your findings and present at the 2008 conference, visit www.fuelcelladvances.com. The closing date for abstract submissions is 8 February 2008.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. Working in partnership with the global science and health communities, Elsevier's 7,000 employees in over 70 offices worldwide publish more than 2,000 journals and 1,900 new books per year, in addition to offering a suite of innovative electronic products, such as ScienceDirect (http://www.sciencedirect.com/), MD Consult (http://www.mdconsult.com/), Scopus (http://www.info.scopus.com/), bibliographic databases, and online reference works.

Elsevier (http://www.elsevier.com/) is a global business headquartered in Amsterdam, The Netherlands and has offices worldwide. Elsevier is part of Reed Elsevier Group plc (http://www.reedelsevier.com/), a world-leading publisher and information provider. Operating in the science and medical, legal, education and business-to-business sectors, Reed Elsevier provides high-quality and flexible information solutions to users, with increasing emphasis on the Internet as a means of delivery. Reed Elsevier's ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Elsevier

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