Mayo Clinic study: Ossur's collars superior in immobilization and reduction of pressure

December 12, 2007

December 12, 2007 (Aliso Viejo, California) - Ossur, an emerging leader in the non-invasive orthopaedics market following several acquisitions and a period of integration, is pleased to announce that the Journal of Trauma has published the long-awaited results of a two year cervical collar study performed by the Mayo Clinic. The study, "Range-of-Motion Restriction and Craniofacial Tissue - Interface Pressure from Four Cervical Collars," finds that Ossur's products - the Miami J and Philadelphia collars - are superior in immobilization and the reduction of pressure, the two most critical factors in determining product for successful trauma patient outcomes.

The Study:

The Mayo Clinic study addressed the ongoing concern that occipital pressure ulcers are well-known complications for trauma patients wearing cervical collars, and assessed the effects of four commercial cervical collars: Aspen, Philadelphia, Miami J, and Miami J with Occian back on cervical range motion (CROM) and mandibular and occipital tissue-interface pressure (TIP).

Background:

Cervical spine immobilization in major trauma patients is routinely carried out to minimize the potential of secondary spinal cord injury. Although cervical injury is detected in only 5 to 10% of unconscious blunt trauma patients, the objective of preventing serious neurological injury necessitates the initiation of spinal precautions in all such patients before cervical spine clearance. Failure to achieve early spinal clearance predisposes the patient to increased morbidity secondary to extended immobilization. Trauma represents 11.4% of non-pediatric and non-maternity hospital admissions. Importantly, restrictive collars are the root causes of skin breakdown in the trauma population. As pressure-ulcers are among the most common, yet serious and costly, complications of routine spinal immobilization, these findings are significant, and factors to be considered when determining the appropriate collar for a patient. It is estimated that pressure ulcers cost $20,000US per incident.

Study Findings:

While all collars significantly restricted CROM in all planes, the Philadelphia and the Miami J were found to be the most restrictive. The Aspen collar was the least restrictive for flexion and rotation. The Miami J and the Miami J/Occian back had the lowest levels of mandibular and occipital pressure. The study's conclusions state that Ossur's collars may markedly reduce the risk of occipital pressure ulcers without compromising immobilization.
-end-
The Original Article:

Journal of Trauma-Injury Infection & Critical Care. 63(5):1120-1126, November 2007. Tescher, Ann N. RN, PhD, CNS; Rindflesch, Aaron B. PT, PhD; Youdas, James W. PT; Jacobson, Therese M. RN, CNS; Downer, Lisa L. RN, CNS; Miers, Anne G. RN, CNS; Basford, Jeffrey R. MD, PhD; Cullinane, Daniel C. MD; Stevens, Susanna R. MS; Pankratz, V Shane PhD; Decker, Paul A. MS.

OSSUR

Ossur (Icelandic Stock Exchange: OSSR) is as much about helping people to live a life without limitations as it is about its orthopaedic products. A trusted and global leader in the development, manufacturing, distribution, sales and marketing of bracing and support products and prosthetics, Ossur pioneers award-winning designs - including its Bionic Technology platform - and partners with the health practitioners who use them to deliver successful clinical and business outcomes. Headquartered in Reykjavik, Iceland, the company has operations and a distribution network throughout the world. The company allocates an industry record of 6-8 percent of its revenue on research and development to conceive and harness the most advanced technologies for incorporation in its product designs, and provides extensive education programs through the Ossur Academy. Ossur is a 2006 World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer. Website: www.ossur.com

Contact:

Ossur Americas:
Melissa Browning Till
Director, Trauma Spine
(508) 380-0444
mtill@ossur.com

Ossur

Related Trauma Articles from Brightsurf:

Early trauma influences metabolism across generations
A study by the Brain Research Institute at UZH reveals that early trauma leads to changes in blood metabolites - similarly in mice and humans.

Childhood trauma affects the timing of motherhood
Women who have experienced childhood trauma become mothers earlier than those with a more stable childhood environment shows a new study conducted in collaboration between the University of Turku and the University of Helsinki in Finland.

Trauma relapse in a novel context may be preventable
Korea Brain Research Institute (KBRI, President: Pann-Ghill Suh) announced on February 10 that its research team led by Dr.

Paving the way to healing complex trauma
A major study led by researchers at La Trobe University in Australia has identified key themes that will be used to inform strategies to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents in the first years of their children's lives.

Improving trauma pain outcomes
A 7-year prospective cohort study from the Corporal Michael J.

Emotional trauma and fear most likely cause of 'Havana Syndrome'
The cause of the mystery illness among US and Canadian diplomats in Havana is most likely to be emotional trauma and fear according to a leading sociologist and an expert in neurodegenerative diseases, writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Making a 'to do' list for trauma docs
Researchers from Drexel's College of Computing & Informatics have been integrating a tablet-based checklist tool into the workflow of a pediatric trauma center and, over the course of 15 months, have shown that it doesn't hamper doctors' performance.

Children develop PTSD when they 'overthink' their trauma
A new study shows that children are more likely to suffer PTSD if they think their reaction to a traumatic event is not 'normal'.

Disparities in access to trauma centers
An analysis of census tract data for neighborhoods in America's three largest cities suggests black-majority neighborhoods are associated with disparities in access to trauma centers.

Psychotic experiences could be caused by trauma in childhood
Researchers at the University of Bristol have made stronger links between psychotic experiences and different types of trauma in childhood.

Read More: Trauma News and Trauma Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.