Springer looks ahead to the Future City

December 12, 2008

Marking the year that the proportion of the global population living in cities reached 50 percent, Springer is launching Future City, an exciting new book series which brings together leading experts from the planning, ecological, engineering and design communities from all over the world. The aim of the series is to discuss the wide range of issues facing the architects, planners, developers and inhabitants of the world's future cities, and to encourage the integration of ecological theory into the aesthetic, social and practical realities of contemporary urban development. Ecopolis, the first volume of the series, has just been published. Around two volumes are planned per year.

Bringing their expertise to this important series is a truly world-class advisory board which includes renowned green architect Ken Yeang, landscape architect and ecologist Joan Nassauer and distinguished ecologist Steward Pickett.

Catherine Cotton, Senior Editor, Ecology and Conservation at Springer, said, "For the first time in human history, half of the world's population now lives in cities. This poses a major challenge in terms of providing urban populations with resources and infrastructure, while reducing environmental impact. This series will provide a forum for key thinkers and practitioners in the many fields relevant to this challenge to exchange ideas and develop an exciting and workable vision for our future cities."

The series will be launched with the book Ecopolis: Architecture and Cities for a Changing Climate by Australian architect, Paul Downton, with a foreword by Ken Yeang. The book highlights the urgent need to understand the role of cities as both agents of change and means of survival at a time when climate change has finally grabbed world attention. It provides a framework for designing cities that integrates knowledge - both academic and practical - from a range of relevant disciplines. Downton is a leading green architect and sustainable development advocate in Adelaide, Australia.
-end-
Springer (www.springer.com) is the second-largest publisher of journals in the science, technology, and medicine (STM) sector and the largest publisher of STM books. Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media, one of the world's leading suppliers of scientific and specialist literature. The group publishes over 1,700 journals and more than 5,500 new books a year, as well as the largest STM eBook Collection worldwide. Springer has operations in over 20 countries in Europe, the USA, and Asia, and some 5,000 employees.

Book Series: Future City, ISSN 1876-0899
Volume 1: Paul Downton, Ecopolis: Architecture and Cities for a Changing Climate
Hardcover €189.95; $279.00, £150.50
ISBN 978-1-4020-8495-9

Springer

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