10 years after attacks on World Trade Center, human health cost is still being counted

December 12, 2011

Oxford, December 12, 2011 - The World Trade Center disaster exposed nearly half a million people to hazardous chemicals, environmental toxins, and traumatic events. According to research published in the December 2011 issue of Elsevier-published journal Preventive Medicine, this has resulted in increased risk of developing physical and mental health conditions after 9/11.

"The New York City Health Department's volunteer and heart disease studies in this issue of Preventive Medicine reinforce the importance of tracking the long-term physical and mental health effects of 9/11 and help inform planning for future 9/11-related health care needs," said New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley.

A study of volunteers who turned out in the thousands to assist the 9/11 rescue operation, shows they, along with others who were directly exposed to the events of the 9/11 disaster, are now suffering from a range of physical and mental illnesses. At particular risk for poorer health outcomes are volunteers not affiliated with groups such as the American Red Cross, whose earlier arrival at the WTC sites and day-to-day work left them less prepared for the horrific events and injuries of 9/11.

Volunteers not affiliated with an organization were more highly exposed to the WTC disaster than volunteers affiliated with recognized organizations and were at greater risk for developing physical and mental health conditions after 9/11, according to the volunteer study. The study showed the need to provide volunteers with long-term screening and treatment for 9/11-related conditions that resulted from hazardous exposures.

A study of adults exposed to 9/11 found that being in the dust cloud, being injured on 9/11, or developing posttraumatic stress disorder increased the risk of developing heart disease years after the disaster.

"This exploratory heart disease study suggests that adults who were directly exposed to the World Trade Center disaster and its aftermath have an increased risk for heart disease," said Dr. Hannah Jordan, first author of the study. "It will be important to confirm and expand upon these findings so that appropriate steps can be taken to prevent heart disease in this population."

Respiratory illness - dubbed 'World Trade Center Cough' - is also more likely to afflict first responders from the Fire Department of New York City than other U.S. males. According to the research in Preventive Medicine, bronchitis is nearly six-fold higher in young-WTC exposed firefighters. The study of 11,000 firefighters demonstrates that the firefighters exposed to the WTC disaster, along with volunteers of all kinds, continue to bear a heavy burden following their remarkable actions ten years ago.

The research appears in the special 'World Trade Center Disaster: 10th Anniversary' issue of Preventive Medicine.
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Notes for editors

Full text of the articles are available to credentialed journalists upon request; contact newsroom@elsevier.com.

Full article citation

Indira Debchoudhury, Alice E. Welch, Monique A. Fairclough, James E. Cone, Robert M. Brackbill, Steven D. Stellman, Mark R. Farfel, Comparison of health outcomes among affiliated and lay disaster volunteers enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry, Preventive Medicine, Volume 53, Issue 6 , 1 December 2011 0091-7435, DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.08.034.

Jessica Weakley, Mayris P. Webber, Jackson Gustave, Kerry Kelly, Hillel W. Cohen, Charles B. Hall, David J. Prezant, Trends in respiratory diagnoses and symptoms of firefighters exposed to the World Trade Center disaster: 2005-2010, Preventive Medicine, Volume 53, Issue 6, 1 December 2011, Pages 364-369, 0091-7435, DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.09.001.

Hannah T. Jordan, Sara A. Miller-Archie, James E. Cone, Alfredo Morabia, Steven D. Stellman, Heart disease among adults exposed to the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center disaster: Results from the World Trade Center Health Registry, Preventive Medicine, Volume 53, Issue 6, 1 December 2011, Pages 370-376, 0091-7435, DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.10.014.

About Preventive Medicine

Preventive Medicine is an international journal, publishing original, scholarly manuscripts pertaining to preventive medicine and public health. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other preventable diseases, lifestyle disorders and interventions, the effects of socioeconomic status on health, and environmental and occupational health. For more information go to: www.journals.elsevier.com/preventive-medicine

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier's online solutions include SciVerse ScienceDirect, SciVerse Scopus, Reaxys, MD Consult and Nursing Consult, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite and MEDai's Pinpoint Review, which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world-leading publisher and information provider, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Media contact
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Elsevier

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