2013 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union

December 12, 2012

Journalists, science writers, and public information officers can now register online to the 2013 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). The meeting brings together over 10,000 scientists from all over the world and covers all disciplines of the Earth, planetary, and space sciences.

EGU's General Assembly is an opportunity for journalists and science writers to learn about new developments in a variety of topics including shale gas and fracking, recent space and planetary science missions, natural disasters, ocean acidification, rare-earth minerals, sea-level rise and glacier melting, among others. The preliminary programme for the meeting, the largest event of its kind in Europe, includes over 700 scientific sessions.

The event will be held on 7 April 2013 at the Austria Center Vienna at Bruno-Kreisky-Platz 1, Vienna, Austria. Members of the media and public information officers are now invited to register online (free of charge) at http://media.egu.eu/registration/.

Further information about media services at the General Assembly is available at http://media.egu.eu. Closer to the date, this website will feature a full programme of press conferences, which will also be announced in later media advisories.

Online (pre-)registration will be available until Friday 8 March. The advance registration assures that your badge will be waiting for you on your arrival to the Austria Center Vienna, giving you access to the press centre and other meeting rooms. You may also register on-site during the meeting.

For information on accommodation and travel, please refer to the appropriate sections of the 2013 EGU General Assembly website, http://www.egu2013.eu.
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More information

The European Geosciences Union (EGU) is Europe's premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. It is a non-profit interdisciplinary learned association of scientists founded in 2002. The EGU has a current portfolio of 14 diverse scientific journals, which use an innovative open-access format, and organises a number of topical meetings, and education and outreach activities. Its annual General Assembly is the largest and most prominent European geosciences event, attracting over 10,000 scientists from all over the world. The meeting's sessions cover a wide range of topics, including volcanology, planetary exploration, the Earth's internal structure and atmosphere, climate, energy, and resources. The 2013 EGU General Assembly is taking place is Vienna, Austria from 7-12 April. For information regarding the press centre at the meeting and media registration, please check http://media.egu.eu.

If you wish to receive our press releases via email, please use the Press Release Subscription Form at http://www.egu.eu/news/subscribe/. Subscribed journalists and other members of the media receive EGU press releases under embargo (if applicable) 24 hours in advance of public dissemination.

European Geosciences Union

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