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Press Registration is Now Open to Health, Science and Genetics Media for 2017 ACMG Meeting

December 12, 2016

Named one of the fastest growing meetings in the USA by the Trade Show Executive Magazine, the ACMG Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting continues to provide the genetics community with groundbreaking education and research. Join genetics professionals from around the world March 21-25,2017 in Phoenix for the opportunity to learn more about the rapidly evolving genetics and genomics field. Connect with doctors, laboratory professionals, and genetic counselors to hear firsthand about advances in medical genetics.

The meeting's focus is on the clinical practice of genetics and genomics in healthcare today and in the future. It provides attendees with the knowledge they need to apply genetics and genomics into their medical practice. From CRISPR to Care Models for Patients with Secondary Findings - the ACMG Meeting continues to provide genetics professionals with insightful information, resources, and tools for best healthcare practices.

Due to the diverse range of topics and sessions, all meeting attendees will find a meeting session of interest. Topics range from common conditions to rare diseases and from ethical to technological issues. Whether you are interested in learning more about how clinical geneticists are approaching challenging diagnostic dilemmas or curious to see the newest technology in the field, there will be something for everyone at the ACMG Meeting.

To give you an idea of the ACMG Meeting schedule, please see below.

Two Genetics Short Courses on Tuesday, March 21:
  • Variant Interpretation from the Clinician's Perspective
  • North American Metabolic Academy (NAMA) at the Society for Inherited Metabolic Disorders (SIMD) 2.0


Program Highlights:
  • Satellite Symposium: The State of the Embryo: An Update on Pre-Implantation Genetic Screening (PGS)
  • Assessing Test Quality In a Time of Rapid Innovation and Market Growth
  • Whole Genome and Whole Exome Sequencing for 'Healthy' Individuals in Clinical Practice: Are We Up to the Challenge?
  • Developing Care Models for Patients with Secondary Genomic Findings
  • The Ticking Time Bomb - Adult-onset Presentations of Inborn Errors of Metabolism
  • Enriching Racial and Ethnic Diversity to Improve Genomic Medicine
  • Toward Next-Generation Newborn Screening: Myth and Reality - R. Rodney Howell Symposium
  • Closing Plenary Session: Hot Topics In Genetics: CRISPR, Synthetic Genomics and Zika Virus
  • -end-
    To see the complete program please visit http://www.acmgmeeting.net to learn more.

    Note - Photo/TV Opportunity: The ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine will present bicycles to local children with rare genetic diseases at the Annual Day of Caring during the meeting on Friday, March 24th from 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM at the Phoenix Convention Center.

    Credentialed media representatives on assignment are invited to attend the ACMG Annual Meeting on a complimentary basis. Contact Kathy Ridgely Beal, MBA at kbeal@acmg.net for the Press Registration Access Code.

    Social Media for the 2017 ACMG Annual Meeting: As the ACMG Meeting approaches, journalists can stay up-to-date on new sessions and information by following the ACMG Social Media pages on Facebook and Twitter and by using the NEW Twitter hashtag #ACMGMtg17 for Meeting-related tweets.

    About the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and ACMG Foundation

    Founded in 1991, ACMG is the only nationally recognized medical society dedicated to improving health through the clinical practice of medical genetics and genomics. The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics provides education, resources and a voice for nearly 2000 biochemical, clinical, cytogenetic, medical and molecular geneticists, genetic counselors and other healthcare professionals, nearly 80% of whom are board certified in the medical genetics specialties. The College's mission is to develop and sustain genetic initiatives in clinical and laboratory practice, education and advocacy. Three guiding pillars underpin ACMG's work: 1) Clinical and Laboratory Practice: Establish the paradigm of genomic medicine by issuing statements and evidence-based or expert clinical and laboratory practice guidelines and through descriptions of best practices for the delivery of genomic medicine. 2) Education: Provide education and tools for medical geneticists, other health professionals and the public and grow the genetics workforce. 3) Advocacy: Work with policymakers and payers to support the responsible application of genomics in medical practice. Genetics in Medicine, published monthly, is the official ACMG peer-reviewed journal. ACMG's website offers a variety of resources including Policy Statements, Practice Guidelines, Educational Resources, and a Find a Geneticist tool. The educational and public health programs of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics are dependent upon charitable gifts from corporations, foundations, and individuals through the ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine.

    American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

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