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What is the most effective treatment for endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia?

December 12, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, December 12, 2016--A new study comparing the effectiveness of oral progestogens versus a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system to treat women with endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN) presents data on patient outcomes compiled over 8 years, as reported in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until January 12, 2017.

Mary Marnach, MD and coauthors from Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, conducted a retrospective analysis to determine which treatment approach was more effective in women with EIN who either wanted to preserve their fertility and not undergo a hysterectomy or were not optimal surgical candidates. Overall, the treatments led to disease resolution in more than 80% of patients with subcategory 1 EIN and more than 60% of patients with subcategory 2 EIN. Intrauterine hormone delivery offers greater convenience and minimal adverse effects, is rapidly reversible, and provides long-term protection of the endometrial lining.

The researchers report their results in the article "Oral Progestogens Versus Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System for Treatment of Endometrial Intraepithelial Neoplasia."

"Available guidelines for the treatment of EIN have been limited due to the absence of data from comparative studies involving substantial numbers of patients," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health. "This study by Marnach et al. demonstrates the effectiveness of two nonsurgical treatment approaches in different subcategories of EIN, and the authors suggest timelines for routine endometrial surveillance."
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About the Journal

Journal of Women's Health, published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the diseases and conditions that hold greater risk for or are more prevalent among women, as well as diseases that present differently in women. Led by Editor-in-Chief Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health, the Journal covers the latest advances and clinical applications of new diagnostic procedures and therapeutic protocols for the prevention and management of women's healthcare issues. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Women's Healthwebsite. Journal of Women's Health is the official journal of the Academy of Women's Health and the Society for Women's Health Research.

About the Academy

Academy of Women's Health is an interdisciplinary, international association of physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who work across the broad field of women's health, providing its members with up-to-date advances and options in clinical care that will enable the best outcomes for their women patients. The Academy's focus includes the dissemination of translational research and evidence-based practices for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of women across the lifespan. Journal of Women's Health and the Academy of Women's Health are co-presenters of Women's Health 2017: The 25th Anniversary Congress which will take place April 28-30, 2017 in Washington, DC.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including LGBT Health, Transgender Health, Population Health Management, and Breastfeeding Medicine. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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