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Oxford University Press publishing the collected works of D. W. Winnicott

December 12, 2016

"This publication presents the works of England's greatest psychoanalytical thinker and writer. An impish, wonderful human being... now lives in this text," said leading British psychoanalyst Christopher Bollas.

Donald Woods Winnicott was one of the most significant psychological thinkers and writers - some would say, second only to Freud - and transformed our understanding of childhood. A paediatrician, psychoanalyst, and tireless communicator, he was internationally renowned for his innovative work with children and mothers. During the Second World War, he treated evacuee children. Later in the 1940s, he recorded broadcasts for the BBC addressed to mothers. His ideas about the "transitional object", the "good-enough mother", and the "true and false self" made him a household name in the mid-twentieth century and are still influential today. For more than fifty years, Winnicott communicated the complexities and importance of the relationship between mother and infant, with empathy, playfulness, and an astonishing prose style.

Now, for the first time, nearly all his writings - nearly two million words - are available in print and online. The Collected Works of D. W. Winnicott is a unique publication that reveals the development of Winnicott's mind and ideas over his lifetime. Psychoanalytic papers, letters, reviews, obituaries, drawings, comments and discussions on political issues, audio recordings: all these and more are brought together for the first time, showcasing the influential work of a prolific, energetic, and compelling voice in British psychoanalysis and writing. The collection also introduces newly-discovered archival material, including an early draft of Winnicott's most famous and influential paper Transitional Objects and Transitional Phenomena.
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Oxford University Press USA

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