Nav: Home

How many adults in the united states are taking psychiatric drugs?

December 12, 2016

About 1 in 6 adults in the United States reported taking psychiatric drugs at least once during 2013, according to a new research letter published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Thomas J. Moore, A.B., of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, Alexandria, Va., and Donald R. Mattison, M.D., M.S., of Risk Sciences International, Ottawa, Canada, used the 2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to calculate percentages of adults using three classes of psychiatric drugs: antidepressants; anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics; and antipsychotics.

The research letter reports:
  • 16.7 percent of adults reported filling one or more prescriptions for psychiatric drugs in 2013.

  • 12 percent of adults reported antidepressant use; 8.3 percent reported filling prescriptions for anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics; and 1.6 percent reported taking antipsychotics.

  • 20.8 percent of white adults reported use of psychiatric drugs compared with 8.7 percent of Hispanic adults, 9.7 percent of black adults and 4.8 percent of Asian adults.

  • 8 of 10 adults taking psychiatric drugs reported long-term use, defined as three or more prescriptions filled in 2013 or a prescription started in 2011 or earlier.


The use of psychiatric drugs also appeared to increase with age, with 25.1 percent of adults 60 to 85 reporting use compared with 9.0 percent of adults 18 to 39 years of age. Women also were more likely to report using psychiatric drugs than men, according to the results.

The authors note that the use of psychiatric drugs may be underestimated because the prescriptions were self-reported.
-end-
For more details and the study findings, please visit the For The Media website.

(JAMA Intern Med. Published online December 12, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.7507; available pre-embargo at the For The Media website.)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Psychiatric Drugs Articles:

Study could help explain link between seizures and psychiatric disorders
In a new study published in Cell Reports, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes identified different types of neurons in a brain region called the reticular thalamus.
Lingering risk of suicide after discharge from psychiatric facilities
A study that synthesized more than 50 years of research into suicide rates for patients after discharge from psychiatric facilities suggests the immediate period after discharge was a time of marked risk and that the risk remained high years after discharge, according to a new article published by JAMA Psychiatry.
Predicting -- and preventing -- psychiatric morbidity after ARDS
A new study, published in Annals of the American Thoracic Society, examined symptoms of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in long-term survivors of ARDS and any associated changes in cortisol levels in the patients.
Psychiatric disorders do not increase risk of Alzheimer's disease
Psychiatric disorders do not increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland.
Researchers propose new diagnostic model for psychiatric disorders
A consortium of 50 psychologists and psychiatrists, including Notre Dame professors Lee Anna Clark and David Watson, has outlined a new diagnostic model for mental illness.
Psychiatric illness may increase stroke risk
Short-term stroke risk appears higher in patients hospitalized or treated in the emergency room for psychiatric illness.
How many adults in the united states are taking psychiatric drugs?
About 1 in 6 adults in the United States reported taking psychiatric drugs at least once during 2013, according to a new research letter published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.
Polypharmacy in psychiatric practice, etiology and potential consequences
Psychiatric polypharmacy is defined as the use of two or more drugs in the treatment of a psychiatric condition.
How do the bugs in your gut affect neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases?
A growing body of scientific and medical evidence continues to shed light on the complex interaction between metabolic pathways affected by microrganisms living in the human gut and gene expression, immune function, and inflammation that can contribute to a range of cognitive, psychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders.
After psychiatric hospital discharge, many patients are still taking multiple antipsychotic drugs
In recent years, measures have been introduced to reduce the rate of 'antipsychotic polypharmacy' -- taking more than one antipsychotic drug -- among patients with schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses.

Related Psychiatric Drugs Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...