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Scientists to present new long-term ecological research findings

December 12, 2018

Microbes and plant roots are hard at work under snow and ice, deep in desert soils, and in the ground beneath our feet. Their activities affect water clarity, salt marsh survival, the impact of drought and the pace of climate change.

New results presented by National Science Foundation (NSF) Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) scientists at the 2018 American Geophysical Union fall meeting reveal hidden realms in ice-covered lakes and deep soils. The conference will take place from Dec. 10 to Dec. 14 in Washington, D.C.

NSF's LTER Network is made up of 28 sites in ecosystems from freshwater lakes and deserts to salt marshes and forests.
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National Science Foundation

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