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Johns Hopkins researchers examine testosterone use to increase BMD in HIV-infected men

December 12, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, December 12, 2018--A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. Further, in HIV-infected men with virologic suppression testosterone was significantly associated with a higher BMD score at the lumbar spine, as reported in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses website through January 12, 2019.

The article entitled "Effect of Testosterone Use on Bone Mineral Density in HIV-Infected Men" was contributed by Philip Grant, Stanford University (Palo Alto, CA), and coauthors from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health (Baltimore, CA), Northwestern University (Chicago, IL), University of Pittsburgh (PA), Johns Hopkins University, and University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

The researchers propose more extensive examinations of the risks and benefits of testosterone use in older HIV-infected men, with a particular focus on its effects to reduce fracture risk.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01A095089, U01-AI-35042, UL1-RR-025005, UM10AI-A1-35043, VO1-AI-35039, UO1-AI-35040, UO1-AI-35041, K24 AI1 20834, K23 AI1 1-532. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

"Osteoporosis and fractures are increased in people living with HIV infection. This study reveals that testosterone use can increase bone mineral density, increasing the overall health of men living with HIV." says Thomas Hope, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses and Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.
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About the Journal

AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, published monthly online with open access options and in print, presents papers, reviews, and case studies documenting the latest developments and research advances in the molecular biology of HIV and SIV and innovative approaches to HIV vaccine and therapeutic drug research, including the development of antiretroviral agents and immune-restorative therapies. Content also explores the molecular and cellular basis of HIV pathogenesis and HIV/HTLV epidemiology. The Journal features rapid publication of emerging sequence information, reports on clinical trials of emerging HIV therapies, and images in HIV research. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Viral Immunology, and Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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