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Loyola neurologist is co-editor of 3-volume, 1,480-page guide to clinical neurology

December 13, 2013

MAYWOOD, Ill. - Loyola University Medical Center neurologist Jose Biller, MD, is co-editor of a three-volume, 1,480-page comprehensive guide to clinical neurology.

Neurologic Aspects of Systemic Disease is part of the Handbook of Clinical Neurology series.

Co-editor is Jose M. Ferro, MD, professor and chair, Department of Neurology, Hospital de Santa Maria, University of Lisbon, Portugal.

The 112-chapter Neurologic Aspects of Systemic Disease provides a comprehensive introduction and overview of the neurologic aspects of systemic disease. Each chapter focuses on the neurologic aspects related to a specific disease presentation.

Part 1 includes detailed coverage of cardiovascular disease, pulmonary diseases, renal diseases and rheumatologic/musculoskeletal disease.

Part 2 includes coverage of gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary, endocrinologic and metabolic diseases and nutritional, environmental and hematologic disorders.

Part 3 includes coverage of oncologic disorders, organ transplantation, infectious diseases, tropical neurology, pregnancy, neuroanesthesia and other diseases and disorders.

Neurologic Aspects of Systemic Disease is published by Elsevier and will be available in February, 2014.
-end-


Loyola University Health System

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