Nav: Home

Slicing optical beams: Cryptographic algorithms for quantum networks

December 13, 2018

"Our models are based on specific quantum functions. They turn classic information into quantum states of photons. Those functions were created to transform algorithms into models of quantum branching programs. We analyzed their cryptographic properties which turned out to be extensions of properties of classic cryptographic hash functions onto quantum examples. That's why we called them quantum hash functions. We are now analyzing cryptographic protocols based on variants of quantum hash functions," explains Research Associate of the UHF Design and Radio Telecommunications Lab Marat Ablayev.

Research results were summarized in Ablayev's recent paper in Lobachevskii Journal of Mathematics. In it, he proves the effectiveness of KFU researchers' quantum hashing algorithms. In the future, quantum authentication can be used for a more secure user experience in banking, vehicle handling, and many other areas.

Quantum cryptography can facilitate fast and secure information transfer in quantum networks. Quantum fiber optic networks based on polarized photon transportation are tested currently in Russia and other countries. Such transfer cannot be breached without detection.

"Information in quantum networks is shaped in an optical beam. We know how to translate that chaos into text, no matter what its contents are, be it a letter, a wire transfer, or a military communication message," says the scientist.

The mathematical models can be used not only for quantum networks and authentication but also for full-scale quantum computing. Quantum hashing can help protect quantum algorithms against mistakes. Relevant research is currently in progress at Kazan Federal University.
-end-


Kazan Federal University

Related Quantum Articles:

Quantum material goes where none have gone before
Physicists have created a quantum material that can travel through a previously unexplored region marked by strange electronic properties.
'Poor man's qubit' can solve quantum problems without going quantum
Researchers have built and demonstrated the first hardware for a probabilistic computer, a possible way to bridge the gap between classical and quantum computing.
Quantum momentum
Occasionally we come across a problem in classical mechanics that poses particular difficulties for translation into the quantum world.
Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds
Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a new quantum computing algorithm that offers a clearer understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, which could help model systems on the cusp of quantum and classical worlds, such as biological proteins, and also resolve questions about how quantum mechanics applies to large-scale objects.
Imaging of exotic quantum particles as building blocks for quantum computing
Researchers have imaged an exotic quantum particle -- called a Majorana fermion -- that can be used as a building block for future qubits and eventually the realization of quantum computers.
Quantum rebar: Quantum dots enhance stability of solar-harvesting perovskite crystals
Engineering researchers have combined two emerging technologies for next-generation solar power -- and discovered that each one helps stabilize the other.
Quantum sensor for photons
A photodetector converts light into an electrical signal, causing the light to be lost.
Listening to quantum radio
Researchers at Delft University of Technology have created a quantum circuit that enables them to listen to the weakest radio signal allowed by quantum mechanics.
In the blink of an eye: Team uses quantum of light to create new quantum simulator
Imagine being stuck inside a maze and wanting to find your way out.
Is quantum computing scalable?
Debbie Leung, a fellow in CIFAR's Quantum Information Science program and a faculty member at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing, will discuss the challenges of scaling quantum computing at the AAAS meeting on Feb.
More Quantum News and Quantum Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.