Nav: Home

MON 810 and NK603 GM Maize: No effects detected on rat health or metabolism

December 13, 2018

For six months, rats were fed a diet containing either GM maize (MON 810 or NK603) or non-GM maize, in varying concentrations. The researchers, using high-throughput biology techniques, did not identify any significant biological markers related to the transgenic maize diet. Neither did anatomic pathology examination reveal any alteration of the liver, kidneys or reproductive system of the rats fed diets containing these GMOs. This research, published on December 10, 2018 in Toxicological Sciences, does not reveal any harmful effects related to the consumption of these two types of GM maize in the rat even after lengthy periods of exposure.

The researchers used two well-known types of GM maize: MON 810, which produces the protein Bt rendering it resistant to certain insects, and NK603 in which the modification of a gene renders it resistant to glyphosate. For 6 months, the rats were fed a diet containing either transgenic maize or non-GM control maize. This time period, which is double that of the test required by European regulations, is equivalent to one third of the average lifespan of rats.

The objective of the researchers was to test for early biomarkers of biological function alterations in rats fed GM maize over periods of 3 and 6 months. For that, they used two ultra-sensitive high-throughput techniques: transcriptomics (gene expression) and metabolomics (study of the compounds derived from the body's functioning). These techniques were used to identify and measure metabolites (amino acids, sugars and other small molecules) and to characterize the expression of messenger RNA and cellular microRNA. These methods are capable of detecting a broad spectrum of metabolic variations. The researchers identified markers able to differentiate the MON810 and NK603 diets. However, following the six-month period of the experiment, no significant differences were identified between the GM and non-GM diets, from the biological point of view.

In addition, in the rats fed the GM diets, anatomic pathology techniques (macro- and microscopic study of the tissues to detect potential abnormalities) revealed no alteration of the organs, particularly the liver, kidneys and reproductive system.

As such, the researchers did not detect any harmful effects of the MON810 and NK603 maize diets on the health and metabolism of the rodents, even after a lengthy exposure period.

1 The GMO 90+ project In 2010, the French Ministry of Ecology launched the Risk'OGM program, in the context of the 2008 law on genetically modified organisms for the establishment of a new legal and regulatory framework based notably on the principle of a triple evaluation of the impact of GMOs - from the health, environmental and socioeconomic standpoints. To set this dynamic in motion and fulfil public authority requirements in terms of expertise, guidance and completed research on GMOs, two calls for research proposals were held, in 2010 and 2013, respectively. The GMO 90+ project was selected during the 2013 call for proposals, with the following scope: to test for biomarkers predictive of biological effects in the study of the subchronic toxicity (3 and 6 months) of GMOs in the rat. Driven by a consortium pooling the various scientific competences, the purpose of this research was to determine whether the feeding of rats with genetically-modified maize led to metabolic changes which could be linked to early effect biomarkers (measurable biological characteristic). The objective was to provide key data which could be used in risk evaluation processes. http://recherche-riskogm.fr/fr/page/gmo90plus
-end-
2 List of project partners: 1-Toxalim (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), Université de Toulouse, INRA, ENVT, INP-Purpan, UPS, Toulouse, France. 2-INSERM UMR-S1124, Toxicologie Pharmacologie et Signalisation cellulaire, Université Paris Descartes, USPC, Paris, France 3- Centre de Recherche sur l'Inflammation (CRI), INSERM UMRS 1149, Paris, France. 4- Laberca, ONIRIS, UMR INRA 1329, Nantes, France 5- Université de Rennes, Inserm, EHESP, Irset (Institut de recherche en santé, environnement et travail) - UMR_S 1085, Rennes, France. 6- Methodomics, France. 7- Institut de Mathématiques de Toulouse, UMR5219 - Université de Toulouse, CNRS - UPS IMT, Toulouse, France. 8- Anses, Maisons-Alfort, France. 9- Profilomic, Saclay/Gif sur Yvette, France 10- UMR1332 Biologie du Fruit et Pathologie, INRA, Université de Bordeaux, Villenave d'Ornon, France. 11- UR 1264, MycSA, INRA, Villenave d'Ornon, France. 12- Laboratoire Reproduction et Développement des Plantes, University Lyon, ENS de Lyon, UCB Lyon 1, CNRS, INRA, Lyon, France 13- CRO CitoxLAB, Evreux.

INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Related Diet Articles:

Poor diet can lead to blindness
An extreme case of 'fussy' or 'picky' eating caused a young patient's blindness, according to a new case report published today [2 Sep 2019] in Annals of Internal Medicine.
New research on diet and supplements during pregnancy and beyond
The foods and nutrients a woman consumes while pregnant have important health implications for her and her baby.
Special issue: Diet and Health
Diet has major effects on human health. In this special issue of Science, 'Diet and Health,' four Reviews explore the connections between what we eat and our well-being, as well as the continuing controversies in this space.
Should you eat a low-gluten diet?
When healthy people eat a low-gluten and fiber-rich diet compared with a high-gluten diet they experience less intestinal discomfort including less bloating which researchers at University of Copenhagen show are due to changes of the composition and function of gut bacteria.
If your diet fails, try again; your heart will thank you
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease closely track with changes in eating patterns, even only after a month or so.
The brain diet
Scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) find that high levels of a hormone called FGF23 are linked to changes in brain structure.
You are never too old for the Mediterranean diet
The Mediterranean diet as a secret of long life for elderly.
Getting to the roots of our ancient cousin's diet
Since the discovery of the fossil remains of Australopithecus africanus from Taung nearly a century ago, and subsequent discoveries of Paranthropus robustus, there have been disagreements about the diets of these two South African hominin species.
A diverse diet may not be the healthiest one
Scientific evidence to date does not support the notion that eating a diverse diet is healthy or promotes a healthy weight.
How was Mediterranean diet associated with severity of psoriasis?
Adherence to a Mediterranean diet, an eating plan filled with fruits and vegetables, legumes, cereals, bread, fish, fruit, nuts and extra-virgin olive oil, may be associated with the severity of the skin condition psoriasis.
More Diet News and Diet Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.